Book Reviews, Having Fun

The Book Owl’s Book Review Video Debut: A Scourge of Pleasantries

Hello Book Nerds of Bloglandia!

If you caught my Mini-Episode/Quick Announcement last week you’ll know I’m taking a spring break holiday from The Book Owl Podcast during the month of April while I do a bit of nest fluffing (aka “trying to stay sane as I get everything in order for my next two book releases in April and May”).

But as is my way, the minute I cross one thing off my to-do list, I quickly add another.

Which, as I mentioned in the mini-episode, is why I got the crazy notion in my head to try out doing some book review videos.

Anyway, in this first quickie video (less than two minutes), I quickly explain what to expect with this madness…

Video Time: Click it, if you dare!!

And in this second video, it’s my premier video review!! No, no, hold your applause a moment, while I introduce it…

The review is for the amazingly hilarious paranormal mystery Gobbelino London and a Scourge of Pleasantries by Kim M. Watt. If you liked my book The Undead Mr. Tenpenny, you’re going to LOVE Gobbelino’s antics (and vice versa)!

Just give a clickity clack on the image below to watch me babbling about this wonderful tale…

Video Time, Part Two: Go on, click it, you know you want to.

Coming Soon…

As I say in that intro video, I’m not sure how regularly I’ll post these reviews. I’ve got a few books lined up that I’m eager to share with you, so there’ll definitely be more coming soon. Whether you like it or not!

Looking for More of the Same?

If like Mr. Tenpenny and Gobbelino London, you enjoy a little paranormal with your fantasies and/or your mysteries, please do have a browse around these book bundles I’ve been invited to join this month.

Remember, these bundles are a crucial part of my ability to get the word out about my books, but I can only be a part of the fun if folks like you check out these bundles.

You don’t have to buy a thing. Just browse a bit. it really does make a difference to me and all the authors involved. And who knows, you might just discover your next favorite story!

Thanks everyone! Just click the image for whichever bundles suit your fancy.

Happy book hunting…

99c and Free Fantasy and Paranormal Fiction (that pretty much says it all, right?):

Witchy Book Fair (paranormal and fantasy fiction with, you guessed it, witches and magic):

Paranormal Women’s Mysteries (mysteries in which the ladies are sleuthing out the clues):

April Fool’s Mysteries (cozies, thrillers, and more…these aren’t necessarily paranormal, but most of them look pretty darn intriguing!):

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Episodes, Having Fun

25. Going to Bookish Extremes

 

The Book Owl Podcast is (almost) a year old! And like many people will do during milestone birthdays, The Book Owl has decided to take things to the extreme. Sorry, it doesn’t involve bungie jumping. In this episode we explore some bookish extremes from the biggest book to the biggest library, the oldest tome to the oldest bookstore, and much more. Fair warning…there is singing involved.

Mentioned in This Episode….

Like what you hear?

The (Rough) Transcript

Hey everyone, this is Tammie Painter and you’re listening to the Book Owl Podcast, the podcast where I entertain your inner book nerd with tales of quirky books and literary lore. 

Intro

So it’s Episode 25. And you’re now saying, so what. Well, right about a year ago (give or take a few day) I released the trailer for The Book Owl Podcast. Yep, it was my vocal debut…laaaa! I was as nervous as you can get without actually having heart failure. And before recording that trailer, and the first three or four episodes, if I’m being honest, I REALLY had to convince myself to get in front of the microphone. Now, recording is the part of putting these episodes together that I enjoy the most…cause I’m a big ol’ ham stuck in an introvert’s body.

And I can hear you saying, What is your point, you mad woman!? My point is The Book Owl Podcast is one year old. So Happy Birthday to the Book Owl!

As many people will do with milestone birthdays, the Book Owl is taking things to the extreme. No, not bungie jumping or parachuting…maybe I’ll save that for the 2nd birthday party. Instead, we’re looking at some extremes of book nerdy trivia. From the largest book to the oldest library, you’re going to have oodles of facts to annoy people with when we do ever get the chance to get together and are forced to make chit chat. You remember chitchat, right? Anyone? Anyone?

Starting Off With Thanks

But before we jump into the extremes of the book world, a triple round of thanks needs to be taken care of. First, I have to thank Ivonne for buying the Book Owl a cuppa as a way to show her support for the show. Ivonne is an Instagram buddy who I swear must be penpals with half the world. She creates some gorgeous letters, envelopes, and papery goodies I’d imagine must be a delight to get in the mail.

A second thanks goes yet again to Jonathon Pongratz for repeatedly sharing the show on his own Jaunts & Haunts blog. And a final bit of thanks goes to LaVelle who took the plunge and purchased some Book Owl swag. It looks like she got a few t-shirts with the Book Owl logo emblazoned across the front, so hopefully she’s enjoying those and sparking people’s curiosity about the show as she sports them around town.

Of course, if you like what you’re hearing, I’m just glad you’re listening, reviewing, and sharing, But if you are enjoying the show and want to lend the owl a little support, there’s loads of very inexpensive ways to do just that by popping into that Support link in the show notes..

Okay, let’s go to the extreme.

Defining a Book

So before we start this I’m going to put out a, I don’t know caveat, explanation, whatever. When I refer to “book” I mean an item made up of pages that is bound together and held in a cover of some sort. 

There are some things that are considered “books” that are actually just a series of tablets, or scrolls, or whatnot, but for this show, a book is what likely immediately comes to mind when someone says book. Not a bookie, that is something entirely different… and something you might want to avoid.

The Oldest Book

So let’s start off with the oldest book out there. And that would be The Golden Orphism Book. Orphism was a religion in Ancient Greece and in Thracia, which is now Bulgaria, and the religion was based around the story of Orpheus, which is actually one of my favorite Greek myths, so cool. But rather than contain that heartbreaking myth, the book is more of a handbook that describes the burial rites of the religion.

The book is 2,670 years old and was only found 70 years ago during a dig in Bulgaria. And it’s pretty small, only 5 cm tall, which is about 2 inches, and weighs right around 100g, or about 3.5 ounces. But for its small size, it’s pretty eye catching as its six pages are made of entirely of gold, hence its other not-so-clever name The Etruscan Gold Book…and I thought I was bad at coming up with titles. But wait, what’s with that Etruscan bit? Well, it was written in Etruscan. Again, not so clever with the naming. 

The Smallest Book

Okay, so at only a couple inches tall, that Etruscan book is kind of tiny, but it’s HUGE compared to the two smallest books in the world. And yeah, I had to cheat here and go with two because for some reason the book Teeny Ted from Turnip Town (great title, by the way) is touted as the smallest. It’s a mere 0.07 mm by 0.10 mm, that’s smaller than a poppy seed! It was created using nano imaging on 30 itty bitty sheets of silica. There were 100 copies made. But while you’re getting your copy, stop by the hardware store and grab a scanning electron microscope because that’s the only way you can read it.

Okay so that’s impressive, but a Russian man, Vladimir Aniskin, created, by hand mind you not with some fancy schmancy nano laser dohicky, a book that measures only .07 by .09 mm, making it 0.01mm smaller than the “smallest book”. So, I’m still confused as to why Teeny Ted is considered the smallest. 

Anyway, Vladimir’s book is made on sheets of super thin film and the crazy part is he bound them with thin wire so you can actually turn the pages, if you have a special tool to do so. And again, you’re going to be glad you picked up that electron microscope because you’ll also need it to read this book, so be sure to add that in to your book-buying budget for the month.

Most Expensive

Speaking of budgets, want to know what the most expensive book in the world is? Well, it’s a little tricky.

Okay, so let me explain…the most expensive book by purchase price was a copy of the Book of Mormon which sold for something like $34-ish million. The second priciest book at the auction house sold for nearly $31 million. And both of those were sold back in the 1990s. But due to adjusting for inflation and the perceived value of the work, that cheapo book is now ranked as the most expensive book in the world.

So what is this pricey book and who’s the luck owner? Well, it was bought by Bill Gates and is Leonardo da Vinci’a Codex Leicester, named for the Earl of Leicester who owned it before Mr. Microsoft. The book was created in 1506-1510 and is full of da Vinci’s notes on fossils, water flow, astronomy, it has sketches of various things from da Vinci’s imaginative mind, and is mostly written in his backwards, mirror handwriting. So it’s expensive sure, but at least buying a mirror to read it is cheaper than that electron microscope.

Largest Book

I like big books and I cannot lie? No? Well, if you can’t impress people with the most expensive book in the world, how about the biggest book in the world? This thing required all sorts of special equipment to put together and is even more impressive because it was entirely handmade using traditional bookbinding methods. It was written, illustrated, and put together in Hungary by Belga Varga. And I don’t know maybe this guy was really into large print books, but this thing is 4.2 m by 3.8 m, which is 14 by 12 feet; it weighs 1420 kg, or just over 3100 pounds; and six people and a special tool are required to turn the pages. 

But don’t worry, it won’t take long to read, because it only has 346 pages. And I bet a lot of that is taken up with pictures since the book is all about the animals, plants, and geology of Begla’s small village. 

Longest Book

But what will take you a long time to read is what’s been deemed the world’s longest book. This is the romantic tale Artaméne, ou le Grand Cyrus and was written in the 17th century by Madeline de Scudery who apparently had a lot of time on her hands. It’s so long it couldn’t be bound into a single book, and was instead put into 10 volumes of romance novel splendor…no word on if Fabio was on any off the covers. 

Okay, so how big is it? It’s a whopping 2.1 million words. To put that into perspective, the average novel these days is about 60 to 80,000 words, and the massive tome War & Peace is about 550,000 words. 

So, are you ready to tackle it? Well, you’re in luck because Artaméne is in the public domain. But fair warning before you dive in, it does only get a 2.9 star average on Goodreads.

Oldest Library

So, let’s close the books and take a look at extreme places to get some books. And just as we started with the world’s oldest book, let’s start with the world’s oldest library. Or let’s try to because again I am a little confused on this bit of trivia. 

So, the place that’s touted as the oldest library was started in 859 CE. It’s the al-Qarawiyyin Library (AL – CORE – OH – WEE- INN) and was founded by Fatima al-Fihri, who was the daughter of a wealthy Tunisian merchant and she also founded the Qarawiyyin Mosque and Qarawiyyin University, so kudos to her! And I did practice that pronunciation with How to Pronounce dot com, so I hope I’ve got it close.

So Fatima’s library fell into disrepair and had to be shut down for a while except to certain scholars. Well, in 2012 a renovation project began, and the library was reopened to the public in 2017.

Okay, so 859 CE, that’s pretty old and like I said, it’s ranked as the oldest, but there is another library at the foot of Mt Sinai that was started around 550 CE and this is the Saint Catherine’s Monastery library and it’s been in continuous use ever since it began. So I’m still not sure why this one isn’t considered the oldest and I couldn’t find a concrete answer to that. Maybe because it’s not exactly a public library, and it’s more of a religious library? I don’t know. So if you happen to know why, please let me know because it’s really bugging me.

Anyway, St. Catherine’s is a UNESCO World Heritage site and it does have the second largest collection of ancient manuscripts, the library in Vatican City has the largest…hey, another extreme and I didn’t even try!

Largest Library

I like big libraries and I cannot lie? Still no? Okay. Well, the battle for extremes continues because we’ve also got some contention for the largest library in the world. And by largest, I don’t mean by square footage, I mean by collection size. 

Because according to the Wikipedia gurus, both the British Library and the Library of Congress have 170 million items in their collections. Although the British Library I think might be trying to squeeze a few more items in by listing their collection size at 170 to 200 million (you know, like they’re not sure…or more like they don’t want to concede to us pesky Americans.). Fair enough. Still, number funding or not, these collections are impressive because the next largest in the list is the Shanghai Library with a mere 59 million items. It’s like they’re not even tying to win. Sheesh.

Oldest Bookstore

And finally we come to our last extreme…the world’s oldest bookstore. And after seeing this place, I really want to go there. It’s Betrand’s Bookstore located in Lisbon, Portugal. And it opened its doors in 1732. Unfortunately, the bookstore itself doesn’t date to 1732 it was toppled in a massive earthquake in 1755. But fear not, the bookstore was rebuilt soon after the earthquake an so can still claim it’s status as oldest. Hoorah for you Betrand’s and some day when I can travel again, I will be browsing your aisles. 

So that’s it for extremes, except now the Book Owl is wondering where the largest birthday cake might be. So while the baker’s get the ovens ready, how about a few updates?

Update Time

I am very very very happy to say that the worst is over in my writing world. For now anyway. 

I just wrapped up the final big edit on the third Cassie Black book, which means the hardest work for the trilogy is done. I’ll still be doing another proofread of book two and possibly give book three one or two more passes, but these really are just going to be proofreading and making teeny tiny tweaks to the language. Which is good because my red pen is nearly out of ink after the last blast of edits I did on both books earlier this month. 

And that was a bit of misery. I read book two and edited it one week, mostly minor edits, but still time consuming. Then the following week I read and edited book three, and that was a pretty big edit going over my own changes and suggestions from my beta readers. And seriously, I hate my own words at this point. But at the end of that second week, I felt a ginormous amount of relief. 

As I’ve said before, I have had more fun than ever writing the trilogy, but the pace to get these last two books done and ready for my review team and for publication has been insane. 

Speaking of review teams, if you want to join mine, there is a link in the show notes to apply. It’s a quick and easy application, but if you like to review books and if you want to see my stuff before anyone else, I’d encourage you to check it out.

Outro

Okay my book loving friends, that is it for this birthday bonanza. I hope you enjoyed the show. If you did, please please please share it with one other person, leave a review, or pop into that link to show your support. Have a great couple weeks and I will hoot at you next time.

Credits

The book owl podcast is a production of daisy dog media, copyright 2021, all rights reserved. The theme music was composed by Kevin Macleod. Audio processing by auphonic .com. Video production by Headliner dot app.

Episodes, Having Fun

23. Super Sappy Letters of Love

 

The Book Owl is a little belated, but this episode is all about the lovey-dovey, super-gushy story of love letters. From that very first Valentine (which may not actually exist) to the oldest (and sappiest) love letter in English, it’s time to use words to bare our souls!

Mentioned in This Episode….

Like what you hear?

The (Rough) Transcript

Hey everyone, this is Tammie Painter and you’re listening to the Book Owl Podcast, the podcast where I entertain your inner book nerd with tales of quirky books and literary lore. 

Intro

Now, I know I’m running a little late with this, but when I was trying to come up with an idea for this 23rd episode of the podcast, it was right around Valentine’s Day and love was in the air. Of course I am head over heels for books and could have maybe come up with a lengthy poem about that lifelong adoration, but since I’m not at all poetic, I thought I’d step away from books this time, and instead turn to another form of writing: the love letter. 

But before we jump into this lovey dovey, super gushy episode, give me just a few moments to share a special announcement. 

The Big Announcement

As you know, I usually save my updates for the end of the show, but I’m a bit too ecstatic over this week’s update to wait that long. So, the big news is, shoot, I should have found a drum roll soundbite, anyway the big news is…

My latest novel The Undead Mr. Tenpenny launched its way into the world on Tuesday. The book is available at all major ebook retailers including Amazon, Apple Books, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, Tolino, and on my very own Payhip BookStore, for slightly less than you’ll pay at the other stores. It’s not a huge discount, but you know. The book also available as a paperback. I know Amazon has it, and if it isn’t already, it should be showing up on other retailers soon.

I don’t want to gobble up too much time here, so I’ll wait until the end of to read you the book description and share some reviews from a few people who have already read the book and who truly gave me the confidence to go ahead with the publication of this novel. So, more on that later. And of course, whenever you’re ready to go do some book shopping, the links and details you need are going to be in the show notes.

A Quick Thank You

And one quick bit of thanks goes out to Jonathon, aka “Jonny”, Pongratz who has been enthusiastically commenting on and sharing the show on his own Jaunts & Haunts blog. 

He’s also been tossing stars around like a Hollywood sidewalk designer with all the reviews he’s been doing on my stories lately. And if you want to see those reviews, the link to his website will be in the show notes. And just as a free bit of “thank you” advertising, Jonny has also just released his own new novel. It’s called Reaper: Aftermath, and you’ll find out all about it if you head to his website at JonathonPongratz.com

Okay, so we have a show to get to.

St. Valentine – Who Are You??

As you might know, Valentine’s Day — besides celebrating all things chocolate — is celebrated in honor of St. Valentine. But who in the world is this guy and what does he have to do with the 14th of February, or with sending gooey sweet cards to your loved ones?

Well, no one really knows. Okay, that’s not exactly true, but in the book that records all things saintly there are three people, and in some accounts seven people, who all fit the bill for being St. Valentine. So what we end up with is kind of a hodge podge of various stories blending into one person over the years. And there really are a lot of bits and bobs to all the Valentine histories, but like a cheap bottle of red wine, I’m going with the blend because it’s far less confusing. 

So our mash up guy had the family name of Valens, which means worthy, and his name got Romanized into Valentinius, or Valentinus, whichever you prefer. I like Valentinius, and it’s my podcast, so that’s what you’re going to get. 

Valentine Proves His Stuff

Valentinius was a Christian priest or possibly a bishop in the third century common era. And this was before Emperor Constantine went and converted all the Romans to Christianity, so being a Christian was still something that was looked down upon by the Roman powers that be. And by looked down upon, I mean you were likely to get sent to the lions if you got a bit too mouthy about your faith.

Since this new religion wasn’t very well tolerated, Valentinius was arrested for trying to spread the word, or for marrying couples in the Christian tradition, again, whichever story you prefer. It’s kind of a choose your own adventure of religious history, right?

Valentinius was put under house arrest in the home of Judge Asterius (who may or may not have had a chubby friend named Obelixius, and if you don’t get that joke, go look up some Belgian comics). Anyway, one day Valentinius and the judge get chatting about religion, as you do. The judge said, “If your god is really so great, and if you believe in him so damn much, then make my blind daughter see again and I’ll do whatever your Christ-loving heart desires.” That’s not an exact quote, by the way.

So of course, voila! Valentinius makes the blind girl see, the judge converts to Christianity and sets all his Christian inmates free, including Valentinius. Not seeing what a lucky break he’s gotten, Valentinius goes back to his rebellious ways and starts trying to convert people again. 

Valentine Doesn’t Learn

The emperor is having nothing to do with this and arrests Valentinius again. But as with the judge, the two get to talking. These people seem to have a lot of conversations with their prisoners. Anyway, the emperor finds out he kind of likes this Valentinius guy. It’s nearly a bromance in the making when Valentinius commits a huge Roman ruler faux pas and tries to convert the emperor. The emperor is like, “Nope, not gonna do it” and sentences Valentinius to be beaten and beheaded. 

And, as the legend goes, while Valentinius is waiting for his execution, he makes friends, or possibly more than friends, with the jailor’s daughter. On the night before hs death, he writes her a note thanking her for her kindness and signs it: Your Valentine. But you know, in Latin. 

The Valentine Scandal

Or so the story goes.

See, none of the records have Valentinius writing that infamous note, and it’s likely it was just an embellishment added to his tale in the 18th century. Which I would just bet is when the greeting card industry was looking for a new marketing scheme.

Anyway, so Valentinius was executed on the 14th of February 269 common era. He was made a saint, I think in 496, if I’m reading things right, but his saint’s day, that would be Valentine’s Day, really wasn’t seen as much more than any other holy day for at least another 500 years. Because it’s not until some time around the years 1100 to 1200 that the day becomes a time to celebrate love and to give your sweetheart a token of our affection…including love letters…because, you know, there were no Hallmark stores yet.

And just as a little side note, in Eastern Orthodox Christianity, Valentine’s Day is celebrated on the 6th of July, so if you forgot to get your sweetie something special this Valentine’s Day, you can try to point out that you’re really not late, but do so at your own risk because that excuse might earn you a smack upside the head.

Famous Love Letters

This whole Valentine and his letters thing got me wondering about famous historical love letters, and this did end up being a fun bit of research. I know this isn’t exactly book-related, but as I said, it is a form of writing and so it does fit with the theme of the podcast.

And there were a ton of examples of famous love letters, but I’ll just run through a handful, then we’ll get to the gushiest, the most dramatic one, which is also the oldest love letter written in English.

One of the oldest love letters is actually in the Bible. I know, this is turning into a very religious epidote, but I promise it stops soon. So this is the Song of Solomon and that book of the Bible is basically just one long, and at times pretty sexy, love poem. And it is pretty gushy.

“Behold, you are beautiful, my love; behold, you are beautiful; your eyes are doves.”

Which is far better than thinking about all those stinky animals on Noah’s Ark.

Alright, so of course, amongst the famous couples of the world we have Napoleon and Josephine. Napoleon was gobsmacked by Jo the moment he saw her, and as a young lieutenant he wrote to her obsessively. For her part, she barely replied. Quite the coquette our Josephine!

In one letter he writes,

“A few days ago I thought I loved you; but since I last saw you I feel I love you a thousand times more… I beg you, let me see some of your faults: be less beautiful, less graceful, less kind, less good…”

Yeah Jo, if you could just suck a little bit, I wouldn’t be tormented by loving you. Nah, he’d probably love her all the more.

A very famous love letter, made even more famous by a movie starring Gary Oldman is Beethoven’s Immortal Beloved letter. We still don’t know who he wrote it to, but man, this guy had it bad…He writes,

“I can only live, either altogether with you or not at all. What longing in tears for you — You — my Life — my All — farewell. Oh, go on loving me — never doubt the faithfullest heart

Of your beloved, L

Ever thine. Ever mine. Ever ours.”

Sorry, is it getting warm in here?

The Oldest Love Letter in English

So the oldest love letter written in English was in fact a Valentines’ Day letter, written in 1477. It comes from a collection of correspondences of the Paston family, and the whole collection gives a really good glimpse into life at that time. And in the show notes, I’ll include a link so you can see the actual letter itself.

It’s written by Margery Brews to John Paston, who is her fiancé. And this letter, so gushy, I wonder if Margery might not be embarrassed that we’re reading it to this day. In the letter it seems like something has come up that maybe her dad isn’t cool with the engagement, but Margery will never give up on her John. 

She’s actually a little scary. 

She writes, and I’m pretty sure this is how she would have said all this..

Unto my right well-beloved Valentine John Paston, squire, I am not in good health of body nor of heart, nor shall I be till I hear from you. For there knows no creature what pain that I endure, And even on the pain of death I would reveal no more. 

And then she goes on saying her mom has been pleading their case, but she’s been getting nowhere for her efforts. But this won’t deter our Marge.

But if you love me, as I trust verily that you do, you will not leave me therefore. For even if you had not half the livelihood that you have… I would not forsake you. 

So basically, even if he’s poor, shed still want him. Then, even though she says her friends have tried to dissuade her from making this promise she swears…

And if you command me to keep me true wherever I go, indeed I will do all my might you to love and never anyone else. My heart me bids evermore to love you truly over all earthly things. 

Finally and quite dramatically, she concludes…

And if they be never so angry, I beseech you that this bill be not seen by any non-earthly creature save only yourself. And this letter was written at Topcroft with full heavy heart.

Yeah, I don’t know John, she sounds a bit clingy…just saying.

Anyway, that is it for love letters, one of the sappiest but also most endearing forms of writing that anyone can do…if they dare!

Reviews are Love Letters to Authors

Alright, as promised, it’s time for more about my book release. And speaking of love letters, I just have to give a big hunk of love to my early readers. As you know from earlier episodes, I had lost a lot of confidence in The Undead Mr. Tenpenny, but I pushed through and sent it out to some brave readers. 

And they didn’t hate it! In fact they’ve loved the humor, the characters, and the story line, and they really gave me the final push to actually release the book. Basically, those reviews were more meaningful than any love letter. So, if you ever think a review doesn’t matter, think again and leave that review!

The Undead Mr. Tenpenny Description

Okay, here’s the description for The Undead Mr Tenpenny, there’s also links in the show notes to some videos to celebrate the book launch – you know, just in case you want to see the face behind the voice, and of course there’s links to do a bit of book shopping.

Okay, so the tagline is

Work at a funeral home can be mundane. Until you accidentally start bringing the dead back to life.

And the description reads,

Cassie Black works at a funeral home. She’s used to all manner of dead bodies. What she’s not used to is them waking up. Which they seem to be doing on a disturbingly regular basis lately.

Just when Cassie believes she has the problem under control, the recently-deceased Busby Tenpenny insists he’s been murdered and claims Cassie might be responsible thanks to a wicked brand of magic she’s been exposed to. The only way for Cassie to get her life back to normal is to tame her magic and uncover Mr. Tenpenny’s true killer.

Simple right? Of course not. Because while Cassie works on getting her newly-acquired magic sorted, she’s blowing up kitchens, angering an entire magical community, and discovering her past is more closely tied to Busby Tenpenny than she could have ever imagined.

If you like contemporary fantasy with snarky humor, unforgettable characters, and paranormal mystery such as Ben Aaronovitch’s Rivers of London series, you’ll find it hard to pry yourself away from this first book of the Cassie Black Trilogy.

A Little Praise from Early Readers

And I’ll just quote a few of those reviewer love letters before I let you go…

The Undead Mr. Tenpenny is a clever, hilarious romp through a new magical universe that can be accessed through the closet of a hole-in-the-wall apartment in Portland, Oregon.

—Sarah Angleton, author of Gentleman of Misfortune

When I saw the book title…my first thought was, “another zombie apocalypse”. A wonderful surprise greeted me with an entertaining story that was written with humor, a great story line and new twist on the undead.

—J. Tate, Eugene Reviewer

…suffused with dark humor and witty dialogue, of the sort that Painter excels at…a fun read for anyone who enjoys fast-paced, somewhat snarky, somewhat twisted, fantasy adventures.

—Berthold Gambrel, author of Vespasian Moon’s Fabulous Autumn Carnival

Wow and wow again! I absolutely loved this book! You get such a feel for the characters and the story is so fast paced you don’t want to put it down.

—Goodreads Reviewer

Outro

Okay my book loving friends, that’s it for this love-filled episode. If you enjoyed the show, I’d love it if you shared it with just one other person, and if you’d like to show your support, please go get a copy of The Undead Mr. Tenpenny from your favorite retailer! Have a great couple weeks, and I will hoot at you next time.

Credits

The Book Owl Podcast is a production of Daisy Dog Media, copyright 2021 all rights reserved. The theme music was composed by Kevin Macleod. Audio processing by Auphonic.com

Book Bargains, Having Fun

Quiz Time: Are You a Well-Read Book Nerd?

Hello My Lovely Little Book Nerds!

Do you love a quiz? Do you love books? Well, then today is your lucky day!

This week over on The Book Club Mom’s blog, Book Club mom herself shared a quiz that tests just how well-read a book nerd you really are. It was a fun time waster and I encourage you to take it if you’re in the mood for some bookish procrastination.

Of course, this is only one person’s interpretation of what it means to be well-read. After all, some books of the books in the quiz aren’t exactly high-quality literature (50 Shades of Grey? Twilight? Really?).

I also found strikingly few examples of non-fiction and genre fiction…after all, being well-read doesn’t have to mean reading gobs of classic lit and literary fiction.

And as someone who reads across all genres (except westerns and romance) and who reads at least a book a week, I was surprised to only score 22%.

Still, like I said, it’s a fun quiz and a nice diversion. If you’re ready to beat my score, you can find the quiz at List Challenges (https://www.listchallenges.com/if-youve-read-10-of-these-books-youre-very)

 

Having Fun

They Want Your Books!

Hello Book Nerds,

Ooh, I hope I didn’t scare you with that post title. Don’t worry, there aren’t monsters lurking behind your bookshelves waiting for you to fall asleep so they can steal your collection.

That would be scarier than 2020!

No, what the post refers to are places that would love to have your book donations. Since the next episode of The Book Owl Podcast (coming to you 14 January) has a book-donation theme going on, I thought a post about where you can donate your own books would be fitting.

Plus, who knows, maybe your New Year’s Resolutions includes tidying up a few bookshelves that may have gotten overpopulated. I’m sure I’m not the only one who has that problem. Am I? Um…anyway…

Where to Donate Books (Besides Goodwill)

  • Your Local Library – Most libraries appreciate getting book donations. Even if they don’t add your books to the stacks, they might included your books in a book sale that will help support your library…which is a great way to earn karma brownie points!

Note: During these ‘rona times, some libraries have limited their intake of used books, check with yours to see before you start lugging boxes of books around.

  • A Little Free Library – You’re book nerds. You probably know what these are. But just in case you don’t, LFLs are homemade book houses that people put up along their front yard. The idea is for passersby to take a book and then maybe drop off a different book later on.

I am very guilty of making heavy use of these glorious little things over the past year as I’ve tried to whittle down my own book stash. Of course, I usually end up bringing home just as many books as I drop off. Oops…

  • Better World Books – This secondhand bookstore has drop boxes in several locations, saving you the trouble of packing up and shipping your donations (as a few of the others above require). Your books are then sold and the money is used to help fund kids’ reading programs, put toward libraries, or to fund adult literacy groups. You can learn more at BetterWorldBooks.com (and you can do some shopping there while you’re at it!)
  • Books for Soldiers – With the motto, “Care packages for the mind,” this terrific idea pairs up your reading tastes with a service member. Soldiers put in requests for books or genres they like. You then look over the requests and send in whatever you have that fits the bill. You can learn more at BooksforSoldiers.com
  • Operation Paperback – Similar to Books for Soldiers, this allows you to search for service members who want books. You can learn more at OperationPaperback.org
  • Books for Africa – This group has sent over 2 million books to 21 countries in Africa to help alleviate the continent’s “book famine.” I just love the idea of hungry readers gobbling up my old books. Learn more at BooksforAfrica.org
  • Books Through Bars – No, not drinking bars…prison bars. This organization delivers something like 3000 books a month to prisons in several states. Reading builds better people, so this is a great way to help society as a whole. Learn more at BooksThroughBars.org

There’s gobs more places to donate books, but I hope this gives you an idea of just a few of the many organizations who would love to take your books off your hands…you know, if you’re ready and willing to give them up. That’s a big “if” for us book nerds!

If you have other places to suggest, be sure to drop them in the comment box below.

Hoot at ya later!

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Looking for new books that won’t take up shelf space?

It’s a great time to stock up on new stories. From 99c deals to box set binging, you’re sure to find something (or several somethings) you can’t resist!