Book History, Episodes

18. Have Book, Will Time Travel

 

Tuesday, the 8th of December, was Pretend to be a Time Traveller Day. Don’t ask me what in the world that is supposed to mean or what kind of presents it involves, but so far, science has let us down with its inability to come up with a time machine. Which means the best we can do is to open the pages of a book and journey along through time with the author’s imagination.

Please note: There is a little jumble in the info at the start. I talk about several stories that send the hero into the future, then I talk about a story that sends the hero into the past, then I say something like  “it seems authors were focussed only on sending people into the future.” Sigh, what can I say, it’s been a long year. So, apologies for any confusion.  

Links Mentioned in this Episode….

Like what you hear?

 

Have Book, Will Time Travel (Rough Transcript)

Introduction

Hey everyone, this is Tammie Painter and you’re listening to the Book Owl Podcast, the podcast where I entertain your inner book nerd with tales of quirky books and literary lore.

And this time we’re getting in our way back machines. Or maybe our way forward machines? Either way we’re traveling through time because Tuesday, the 8th of December, was Pretend to be a Time Traveller Day.

Don’t ask me what in the world that is supposed to mean or what kind of presents it involves, but I’m sure Doc Brown and Marty McFly could clue you in.

The Icky Part I Have to Do…

Before we start, just a reminder that this show is supported by you. Of course, since we’re speaking about time travel, you could use the fast forward feature on your podcast app to time travel past this part, but I’ll try to make this quick.

There are a ton of ways you can support the show and most are super inexpensive, including, as I mentioned last time, just doing your normal Amazon shopping through the Amazon affiliate link you’ll find on TheBookOwlPodcast.com/support. You don’t get charged any extra but every time you shop, I get an itty bitty commission that helps contribute to the time I spend bringing you these tidbits of entertainment.

And since it’s gift-giving season, also on that page you’ll find some snazzy Book Owl merchandise. I’ll admit some of these items are quite costly and I don’t earn much commission from them, but if you’re looking for something unique to treat yourself this holiday season, there’s notebooks, stickers, and t-shirts.

Intro Part Two Because Once Isn’t Enough

Okay, enough of that, let’s get time traveling. Or more accurately, let’s look at time travel in fiction throughout the ages. See, it’s sort of time traveling.

I think we’d all agree if we’d known what 2020 was going to involve a time travel machine would have been a well appreciated 2019 Christmas present so we could just skip over the year.

But so far, science has let us down with its inability to come up with a time machine. Which means the best we can do is to open the pages of a book and journey along through time with the author’s imagination.

Mythology Meets Physics

It turns out the concept of time travel stories aren’t anything new. Hindu mythology includes what might be recognized as the oldest time travel tale. In this story  the king travels to meet the creator god Brahma for I don’t know, maybe a nice chat and a cup of chai? Whatever his reason for going, when the king returns he finds out decades have whizzed by in his absence.

Which, if you know anything about physics, isn’t too far off the mark. Assuming Brahma lived in the sky or on top of a very high mountain, science does show that time moves more slowly for people who are under less gravity. So someone up in a spaceship actually ages less than someone on Earth. It’s a fascinating discovery, albeit an absolutely creepy one, and it has been proven using really accurate timepieces.

But this isn’t the Physics Owl Podcast, so let’s get back to the fictional side of time travel.

Japanese Sea Monkeys?

Moving up the ages and shifting over a few thousand miles to the east, we get a collection of fairy tales from Japan that dates to around 750 CE. One of these bedtime stories tells of a fisherman who decides catching fish isn’t how he wants to spend his weekend, so he heads underwater to hang out in a sea palace. And yes, this had me picturing a scene from a Sea Monkeys ad.

The fisherman hangs out with the Sea Monkeys for a few days, but when he returns to the surface, after he takes a big gulp of fresh air, he finds out he’s been transported 300 years in the future. And I hope he enjoyed his time in the sea palace because obviously by this time no one knows who he is, he’s lost his boat, and all of his family have died. Which does make this a pretty miserable fairy tale, so maybe we should move on.

Sleepy Head Time Travel

So while the idea of playing loose with time isn’t anything new, it does take a while for technology to catch up with time travel. Even though machines were already making their way into our lives and changing them sometimes for the better, sometimes for the worse, these machines take a long time to work their way into fiction.

And rather than jumping into a machine, we find a lot of earlier time wandering tales involves someone falling asleep and waking up in the future. Which makes me wonder if you force yourself to stay awake will you go back in time? Think about it.

Anyway some of these sleepy stories include Rip Van Winkle by Washington Irving from 1819 , Looking Backward by Edward Bellamy from 1888, and The Sleeper Awakes by H.G. Wells who we’ll be returning to soon enough.

Ow, My Head!

Similar to the sleepy head version of time travel, is the conked on the head method of time travel. And probably one of the most humorous and famliar examples of this in Mark Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.

There’s a lot going on in this simple tale, but the title pretty much sums it up. A man from Connecticut, Hank Morgan, gets hit on the head and this sends him back in time to King Arthur. Hank gets captured by one of Arthur’s knights, then uses his knowledge of the high tech world of 1889 to convince everyone he’s a magician and that it would be a really bad idea to kill him.

Hank tries to make things better for King Arthur and even tries to prevent Arthur from being killed, but no luck. And while this story was well-received in the US, in England they saw it as an attack on the institution of the monarchy.

Take Me Back

So, from these examples it would kind of seem that most writers were obsessed with getting a glimpse into the future, but a few, and some of the earliest time travel stories in English have our travelers going back in time.

These include the short story Missing One’s Coach: An Anachronism, and this was written anonymously in 1838 for the Dublin Literary Magazine. In it our hero waits under a tree for a coach to show up and falls asleep. When he wakes find himself roaming around in the 9th century. He tries to tell people about the future and a few believe him, but most thinks he’s a bit doodalalee.

Another early example of backward time travel comes from Paris avant les hommes (Paris before Men) written in 1861 by the French botanist and geologist Pierre Boitard, although it wasn’t published until after his death which is too bad for him because it turned out to be a pretty popular story. In this story, we finally see someone time traveling without falling asleep or receiving a head injury. Instead a magic demon sends the main character  into prehistoric times where he hangs out with dinosaurs. Maybe the precursor to Jurassic Park.

Twenty years later we get “Hands Off by Edward Everett Hale in which the main character goes back to Ancient Egypt and tries to change Biblical history by keeping Joseph from being enslaved by the pharaoh. And while this is one of a few stories of someone going back rather than forward in time, it’s also quite likely the first time travel book where the character’s interference alters history.  

A Little Back and Forth

But why stick with the past or the future? Can’t we have both? Yep, and Charles Dickens was ready to deliver this…well, sort of. His A Christmas Carol published in 1843, does take old Ebenezer back in time, but it’s not as if he can do anything while he’s there. It’s merely a memory the ghost of Xmas past is forcing him to remember.

And if memory is time traveling, I guess I’ll time travel back to a really tasty sandwich I had in Strasbourg last fall. But Ebenezer does the travel to the future. Or at least a potential future and it’s this potential future that is one of the key themes of time travel fiction.

As Scrooge says after seeing the dismal fate the ghost of Xmas yet to come has shown him “Men’s courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead,” said Scrooge. “But if the courses be departed from, the ends will change. Say it is thus with what you show me….Assure me that I yet may change these shadows you have shown me, by an altered life!”

And yay, Tiny Tim lives happily ever after. Oh, I hope that wasn’t a spoiler for anyone.

The Rise of the Machines

But most of us, when we think of time travel probably aren’t thinking of naps, blows to the head, or creepy ghosts hanging out in our bedrooms. We have an image in mind of a machine like some strange chamber or a souped up Delorean, that moves our hero through time.

And while HG Wells’s Time Machine probably is the first thing that springs to mind, he wasn’t the first to come up with the idea of a manmade object making a mess of the world’s timeline.

In fact, we start out not with a large machine you step into, but with The Clock That Went Backward a story from 1881 by Edward Page Mitchell. Moving the hands of the clock shifted time. But unless you can open up the grandfather cook and step inside, it’s still not what we think of as a time machine, is it?

Finally in 1887 we get Enrique Gaspar y Rimbau’s El Anacronópete which is touted at the first story to have a true machine purpose built for time travel. It’s a huge iron box that’s like something straight out a steampunk novel with pneumatic tubes that are driven by electricity.

And weirdly enough, inside the machine are brooms that sweep themselves. Oh wait! Isn’t that a roomba! Anyway, all is going well as the voyagers visit various eras in the past, until it self destructs when they try to go to the day of creation.

Finally We Get to THE Time Machine

But of course, although there were predecessors the book that really stirred up the popularity of the time machine was HG Wells’s The Time Machine. This wasn’t Wells only foray into wandering around in time. Before this he’d written “The Chronic Argonauts” in 1888. Wells had thought of turning this story into something else, but wasn’t quite sure what exactly.

Then his publisher asked to see a serial novel based on time travel. Wells didn’t hesitate a moment to jump on the idea. The fact that the publisher was offering him the equivalent of 12K pounds in today’s money probably didn’t make the decision too tough to make.

In The Time Machine, the narrator is relating lectures about a man who traveled to the future and discovered a race of people who seemed happy and living the good life without having to work very hard, but then realizes it’s because another race of people have been forced to toil underground to keep everything running smoothly.

And much of the inspiration came from Wells own childhood where he and his family and the people they knew worked their fingers to the bone below stairs or literally underground in mines.

Time Travel Travel

But egad, that’s a bit depressing isn’t it? So let’s wrap up time travel on a happier note and that’s a subgenre of the time travel concept…Time tourism. Think about it. How many of us would love to take a time tour anywhere that isn’t 2020?

In 1948 American authors Catherine L. Moore and Henry Kuttner wrote the novella Vintage Season in which visitors from the future vacation at a rental home just when the owner wants to sell. The visitors like his place so much they tell heirs friends all about the quaint little place.

Then there’s Ray Bradbury’s 1952 Season of Thunder (season being a popular title, I guess) in which big game hunters get bored with killing off rhinos, lions, and elephants, and decide to time travel to the age of dinosaurs. I mean, go big or go home right?

Time Goes On

Anyway, the time travel genre started strong and continues to thrive today in books like Stephen King’s 11/22/63 when a man has to decide whether stopping the assassination of JFK is worth losing the love of his life.

There’s Diane Galbaldon’s Outlander series with men in kilts. Lots of kilts. And a woman who never seems for a moment phased by the fact she’s gone back a couple hundred years in time.

Michael Crichton brought the past to life with Jurassic Park, but he also took us back in time using some really amazing science research in his book Timeline.

And of course, we can’t leave off without Douglas Adams’ Hithchiker’s Guide to the Galaxy series where the most sought after dining establishment is The Restaurant at the End of the Universe which is called Millways. Milliways is the nearest restaurant in space but not time, and is a five star restaurant situated at the end of time and matter.

As with anything in the Hitchhiker’s series it’s a hilarious concept, especially how you make reservations and raise the money to pay for a meal there, but if you do as describe you can watch the universe end night after night while enjoying your Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster.

Update Time

And that is it for time travel so that must mean it’s time for your favorite…updates! The podcast is still plugging along. Another big thanks goes out to Tierney of TierneyCreates.com for including The Book Owl’s history of cookbook episode as part of her Thanksgiving celebrations.

Other than that, my next episode will be a little bit different. One tagline for this podcast is everything books minus the reviews, but just to wrap up the year I’m going o share with you my favorite books of 2020, a year when many of us got more than our fair share of reading in.

As for writing, as I mentioned last time, I put in the order for my proof copies of the first two books of my Cassie Black trilogy. Well, they showed up the day after Thanksgiving and they came out pretty darn good. There’s still a little tweaking to do on the covers, but the interior looks great. This month, I’ll give the first book yet another read through while also doing a full rewrite on book three.

And just in case you like to do a little shopping for yourself, all three books are currently on pre-order on most retailers. Unfortunately, you can’t pre-order the paperbacks, but I usually release those just a few days ahead of the ebook release date just to make sure everything goes through on time. I’ll keep you posted on when those are live on the stores.

Signing Off

Okay my time traveling buddies, that is it for this episode. Have a great couple weeks, and I will hoot at you next time.   

The Book Owl Podcast is a production of Daisy Dog Media, Copyright 2020, All rights reserved. Theme Music “Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License Audio processing by Auphonic.com

Book History, Episodes

17. Cooking Up Something Good

 

Happy Thanksgiving to my American listeners!

Because Thanksgiving is THE holiday where food takes center stage, I bet there’s more than a few of you out there reaching for a cookbook this week. Which is why The Book Owl went into research mode to discover the history of cookbooks.

From rotting meat to imaginary friends, it’s a recipe for concocting a great episode. And, there’s even a special guest who tried to take over the show.

Links Mentioned in this Episode….

Like what you hear?

Cooking Up Something Good (Rough Transcript)

Introduction:

Hey everyone, this is Tammie Painter and you’re listening to the Book Owl Podcast, the podcast where I entertain your inner book nerd with tales of quirky books and literary lore.

And let me offer up a very Happy Thanksgiving to my listeners in the U.S. I hope everyone is keeping their distance and that you’ve got a plan in place for all that leftover turkey.

Because Thanksgiving is a holiday all about food and especially food we don’t normally cook — seriously, at what other point in the year do you suddenly think, “OMG, I just HAVE to make cranberry sauce?” — I thought this would be an excellent time to explore a type of book many Americans will be cracking open this Thursday.

The Part Where I Ask You to Go Shopping

But before we start, just a quick reminder that you help keep this show running. I need to offer up a very belated thank you to LaVelle for being a continued sponsor of the show with her monthly gift. 

Unless you’re feeling especially flush with money, there’s no need for you to be quite so generous, but I want to remind you that you can help the show out by doing nothing more than the normal shopping you plan to do on Amazon this holiday season. 

Any time you feel the itch to purchase a pack of dog food, a new pair of yoga pants, or a book that you intend to give as a gift but end up keeping for yourself, before you start shopping please head to the book owl podcast dot com slash support and use the Amazon link on that page to do your shopping.

That’s an affiliate link and it does not cost you anything extra, but does earn me an itty bitty commission that really does add up.

What? Another Introduction? Fine…

Okay, enough of that. So, if you’re going to be in the kitchen this week, I bet at some point you’re going to be reaching for a cookbook of some sort. Which had me curious about the history of these most valuable kitchen tools.

Well, okay, the electric kettle that keeps me fueled with tea is the most valuable in my opinion, but you know, cookbooks, second most valuable.

The Oldest Cookbook…and Recipe Success

It turns out the oldest cookbook, or at least the oldest one that’s been discovered, dates from 1700 BCE and has no pages. Wait, let me clarify. It’s actually a collection of a handful of recipes on a series of four clay tablets that are part of what’s known as the Yale Tablets.

And no, they weren’t unearthed in Yale, they’re called that because they’re housed in the Yale Peabody Museum as part of the Yale Babylonian Collection. Lot of Yales going on there.

Anyway, the main recipe on these tablets is a meat stew that contains meat, obviously, vinegar, and herbs, and is said to resemble a stew that was so adored by kings, it ended up being written about in stories for over 300 years.

And just like finding an interesting recipe in a magazine, some researcher said, “Hey, let’s give this a try.” So in 2018, a few brave folks from New York University recreated the stew as best they could with modern equivalents of the ingredients.

The result? Turns out it was pretty darn tasty. And I’ll include a link to their experiment in the show notes.

Cooking Up Food Poisoning In Ancient Rome

So moving up about 1800 years, we get to the first century CE and we find the earliest European cookbook, the De re coquinaria. And I’m no Latin scholar, but I think that translates to from the king’s kitchen. An if there is a Latin scholar to there, please let me know if that’s right or wrong. 

Anyway, this book was supposedly compiled by the Roman Marcus Gavius Apicius, and he was the celebrity gourmand of the day. And he and his book were so influential, any collection of recipes came to be known as an Apicius for decades to come. 

Now, in Ancient Rome the goal of cooking, what chefs gained fame for was being able to take your main food item and flavoring it and covering it up so much you could not tell what you were eating.

This wasn’t because Romans loved eating the Surprise du Jour. It was because, well, how do I put this? They didn’t exactly have refrigerators and they weren’t exactly bringing in fresh meat every day.

And I really hope this isn’t familiar to you, especially today, but the cooks had to do everything they could to hide the taste of the rotting meat they were serving up. Yum.

Chinese Cookery Classic

Stepping away from Europe for just a bit and jumping forward again in time (I know, you haven’t travelled this much in months, have you?). We’re popping over to China where there are reports of cookbooks dating all the way back to the Tang Dynasty, which was extended from the years 600 to 900, but some pesky person lost it. Or maybe spilled soy sauce all over it. 

Either way, the earliest surviving Chinese cookbook dates from about 1330, and I’m not going to attempt the Chinese name for the book, but in English it translates to the name Important Principles of Food and Drink. And I really hope the recipes inside weren’t as bland as that title.

Germans Love Their Cookbooks

Okay, zipping back over to Europe, we find medieval Germans really liked to cook. Or at least they really liked cookbooks, because it’s here we find the most cookery manuscripts. These include Das buch von guten spise, or the Book of Good Food from 1350.

And probably no surprise, but the Germans were also the first to employ our friend the printing press to publish a cookbook in 1485, with the name Kuchenmeysterey, or Kitchen Mastery. Which has a rather modern marketing ring to it.

A Cookbook for the Average Householder

Again, no surprise, but the French also had a few cookbooks on their shelves. And like most of the other cookbooks I’m talking about from this time period, these were all intended for chefs who were cooking for the highest levels of society, including the king. For example, the earliest French cookbook we have was written in the 14th century by Guillaume Tirel, the master chef for not one, but two French kings. 

But we have a little rebel in France, and as far as I could tell, this might be the earliest cookbook written for common people, or rather for women making food for their families. This was La Menagier de Paris, or the Householder of Paris, and was written by a middle class Parisian for other middle class Parisians.

Curry? Did Someone Say Curry? The First English Cookbook

Of course, there were also cookbooks from Italy, Spain, the Middle East, India, but since I’m a self-centered English speaker, let’s head back up to England where we’ll find the first cookbook written in English. It dates from 1390 and was penned by the chef of King Richard II, and had the intriguing title Forme of Cury.

And now I really want some curry, but I think a cure referred to any type of stew, so there’s probably not a spicy vindaloo amongst the pages.

Printing Press By-product: The Celebrity Chef Begins

So as I mentioned earlier, the Germans were the first to crank out a cookbook from the printing press. And this kicked off a wave of cookbook publishing in the 1600s when we see a huge profusion of books coming out for household management and food preparation. 

And you’re going to need that advice because right around this time, especially in Holland and England, it becomes quite the thing to see who amongst your ritzy friends can throw the most lavish banquets. This is when we really start seeing food preparation being turned into an art form — and let’s be honest, that artwork is probably still being used to cover up the taste and smell of meat that’s gone off. 

And as is still happening today, chefs start becoming celebrities. Households fight over hiring the most renowned cooks and the chefs themselves start competing pretty viciously with each other to see who can write the most popular cook book. Which sounds like the set up for an amazing historical novel full of bitchy backstabbing.

Coming to America

But enough of Europe, let’s hop the pond over to America where we find Amelia Simmons in 1796 writing the book American Cookery, which she declared was “adapted to this country and all grades of life.”

And as the article from Book Riot I used as apart of my research snarkily notes, there weren’t a lot of grades of life who could afford to purchase cookbooks so this was probably intended mainly for the upper class. But the book did manage to stay in publication for 30 years.

What’s a White Lady to Do?

Also in that article which I’ll link to in the show notes I found an interesting correlation between the American Civil War and the rise of cookbooks in the American South. See, most middle and upper class households had um, shall we say, free labor running their kitchens. 

When slavery was abolished and the freed people said, “I’m outta here,” the white ladies were kind of left in the lurch. And some of them could probably still hire cooks, whether those cooks were black or white — and that hired help was probably mostly black, if we’re being realistic. 

But many other former slave owners had lost their free labor which also meant they lost a cheap way to make gobs of money which also meant they were left to do their own cooking. Well, after years of being tended to by unpaid servants, these white ladies had little idea what to do in the kitchen. 

Luckily, one of the books that appeared was written by Malinda Russell, a freed slave who, in her book used the euphemism that she was an experienced cook. And her recipes start to show a pattern in presentation that would continue to evolve, including putting a list of the ingredients at the start of the recipe. Unfortunately, the amount of those ingredients still required a fair bit of guesswork.

Brussels Sprouts and Measuring Spoons!

It’s not until 1845, when with the release of Modern Cooking for Private Families by Eliza Acton that we get not only a book written entirely for the home cook, but we also get the format we know today with the list of ingredients, the full instructions of what to do with those ingredients, and precise cooking times.

It also, as a little side fun fact, was the first book in the U.S. to have a recipes for Brussels sprouts.

But while Eliza’s book had plenty of information, it could still be a bit vague. Because there were no standardized tools, cookbooks at the time didn’t exactly pinpoint exact amounts or temperatures. For example, one book told people to heat water until it was a little warmer than the temperature of milk coming straight from the cow. Which has me picturing some poor woman running back and forth from her stove to the barn to keep checking on things.

It’s not until the early 20th century before we start seeing more precise recipes. And that’s because we finally got standardized measuring cups and spoons. And, thankfully, we moved away from wood-burning stoves and ovens whose temperature couldn’t be regulated, to electric and gas stoves that could be set to a specified temperature. And cookbooks quickly started incorporating these marvels into their recipes.

The Best-Selling Cookbook of All Time

Finally, we can’t get away from cookbooks without mentioning the best-selling cookbook of all time…The Betty Crocker Cookbook. Betty, as you might know, doesn’t exist. She was completely made up by the company that would later be known as General Mills. And she came about because people kept writing in asking questions about the company’s products.

So, kind of like a cooking Dear Abby, they created Betty to answer the questions. And they chose the name Betty because it sounded friendly and cheery, and Crocker was the last name of the company’s recently retired director.

The imaginary Betty Crocker was born in 1921, and became hugely popular. And like many celebrities, she eventually came out with her own cookbook. The first Betty Crocker Cookbook was published in 1950.

It not only contained recipes, but also practical household tips, and plenty of sympathy and understanding for the trials and tribulations of the mid-century housewife. It was so popular it outsold the Bible in its first year of publication, and had since sold over 65 million copies. And yes, I have my own tattered copy in the kitchen.

But Wait, There’s More

So that’s it for a quick history cookbooks. But I couldn’t resist researching one more thing, and that is the weirdest cookbooks. As you might guess, it generated seem hilarious hits that I’ll be sharing with those of you who are on The Book Owl Podcast Newsletter. And if you want to get that newsletter, yep, there’s a link in the show notes.

Podcast Updates

I guess that means it’s time for updates. As for the podcast, there’s not much to report. Just keep listening and keep recommending the show to others, and I’ll keep trying to crank out episodes. Of course, if you have an idea for a book, an author, or a bit of literary lore you’d like me to explore, feel free to contact me with your topic ideas by using the link in the show notes. 

Writing Updates…Prepping for Cassie Black

As for writing updates, I’ve been putting together all the parts to get my Cassie Black Trilogy ready for release early next year. That means getting titles, covers, and descriptions together for all three books. I’ve also formatted the paperbacks for the first two books — book three isn’t to that point yet, but getting closer.

And I’ve gone on a mad spree of writing a stockpile of blog posts to share Cassie’s creation, inspiration, and quirks with the world over the next few months. I know, big surprise, but there’s a few links in the show notes if you’d like to see the process of coming up with titles and the evolution of the books’ cover design.

Signing Off

Okay my home cooks, that is it for this episode. Stay safe, keep your distance, don’t eat too much, and I will hoot at you next time.

 

The Book Owl Podcast is a production of Daisy Dog Media, Copyright 2020, All rights reserved. Theme Music “Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License Audio processing by Auphonic.com

Authors, Book History, Journalism, podcast

Around the World with Nellie Bly

Hello Book Nerds!

It’s a mash-up episode this time around! After reading 80 Days Around the World, I was reminded of Nellie Bly’s race around the world in 1889.

Who was Nellie Bly? How did she change the writing world for women? And was Jules Verne’s novel nothing more than a product placement ad? Find out in Episode (Lucky Number) 13.

Behind the Scenes

After reading 80 Days Around the World for the first time recently, I had planned on doing a whole episode on the book. But as I was reading it (or listening to it since I got the audiobook from the library), I kept thinking about another book I’d read a few years ago titled Eighty Days. It recounted the true life competition of two women racing around the world as part of a newspaper stunt.

One of those women was Nellie Bly, and I thought it would be perfect to combine an 80 Days Around the World episode with Nellie’s tenacious efforts to make her name in journalism. Stick with me here. This will all come together, I promise. Or at least, I hope.

Enjoy the episode!!!

As usual, clicking the image below will take you to the episode’s web page where you can listen right in your browser, or you can use the links just under the image to find plenty of other listening options. And remember, all these listening options are completely free!!

 

Listening links…

Links mentioned in this episode…

*Note: The book link above is an affiliate link. It costs you nothing extra, but I earn a teeny tiny commission on your purchase to help with the costs of running this podcast. Thanks for your support :))

The (Rough) Transcript

(Want photos with your text? With each episode my newsletter subscribers get images plus other bonus features to help them get more out fo the show. Sign up today at https://www.subscribepage.com/bookowlpodcast)

Hey everyone, this is Tammie Painter and you’re listening to the Book Owl Podcast, the podcast where I entertain your inner book nerd with tales of quirky books and literary lore.

So it’s episode 13 and this time we’re talking about a pioneering woman named Nellie Bly. If you’ve never heard of her, you’re probably not alone…although I think there’s a movie being made about her exploits. Anyway, she was quite the go getter in the writing world…and around the world. 

But before we start. I screwed up! In Episode 12, while I was rambling on about Agatha Christie, I missed a beat and said something like, “In 1914, World War II broke out.” Yeah, that would be World War I going on in 1914. Oops. And thanks to David Anderson for catching that flub…and teasing me about it. But I’ll let him get away with that because he’s my husband…but the next time he makes a mistake…yeah. I did add the correction to the show notes for that episode. I just hope no historians start trolling me.

Also, thank you to everyone who enjoyed the Agatha Christie episode. Special thanks to LaVelle Stumpf (aka “my mom”) and Tierney of TierneyCreates.com for leaving comments about how much you enjoyed the episode.

Alright, so Nellie Bly. Who is she and what does she have to do with Jules Verne? Well Nellie was a journalist and while she didn’t invent the notion of investigative journalism, she was one of the first ladies who showed women could be just as hard-hitting as male reporters. Now, if you’re scratching you head wondering how this relates to books, we have to take a couple steps back to the publication of Jules Verne’s story 80 Days Around the World.

Now, I had planned on doing a whole episode on 80 Days Around the World because I just read the book for the first time and I loved it. But as I was reading it (or listening to it since I got the audiobook from the library), I kept thinking about another book I’d read a few years ago titled Eighty Days. It recounted the true life competition of two women racing around the world as part of a newspaper stunt.

One of those women was Nellie Bly, and I thought it would be perfect to combine an 80 Days Around the World episode with her tenacious efforts to make her name in journalism. Stick with me here. This will all come together, I promise. Or at least, I hope.

So if you’ve never read it, 80 Days Around the World tells the tale of Phileas Fogg and his servant Passepartout going around the world in under 80 days. They do this to win a £20,000 bet Phileas has made at his club in London, and poor Passepartout is really put through his paces the entire way through the tale. And to me he is the main character of the story, although Phileas Fogg seems to get all the credit.

As many stories were done back then, the book was published in serial form with the first installment coming out on the 2nd of October 1872 and people watched the pair journey through the Suez Canal, across India (where they stop to rescue a princess), on to Singapore, San Francisco, New York, Ireland, then back to London. The final installment came out on the 21st of December…the same day as the fictional Phileas’s is set to return to London.

And you might know Jules Verne for his science-based stories like 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, and science and technology does play a key part in the novel because he makes use of recent developments such as the Transcontinental Railroad in the US, the linking of the Indian railways, and the opening of the Suez Canal. 

People were hooked on this story. So much so that they thought it might be real. They even placed bets on whether or not Phileas would make it in time. No word on how many won or lost those bets. And in sort of a modern twist, there is speculation that the book is basically a huge product placement ad because Verne gets very specific in naming certain trains and ships and their amenities. Hey, whatever you can do to make a buck, right.

So now let’s get back to Nellie Bly. She was born in Pittsburgh in 1864, as Elizabeth Jane Cochran. She started in on her higher education, but had to drop out after only one term because he didn’t have enough money for tuition. 

And you kind of have to admire how Elizabeth gets her first writing gig. Basically she gets angry and sends off a letter…that’s what people did back in the day before there were Twitter rants. See in 1880, she had come across an article titled “What Are Girls Good For?” which pretty much came straight out and said girls were good for nothing but keeping house and making babies.

I know, right?

So Elizabeth zips off her letter to the jerk face newspaper under the name Nellie Bly, the pseudonym she would end up writing under for the rest of her career. The editor of the newspaper ends up being so impressed with this Nellie’s eloquence and reasoning, he puts out an ad asking her to reveal herself. Eventually, she did and took a commission from him to write an article which ended up being about how divorce laws were set up to ruin a woman’s life. Mr. Editor is once again impressed and takes her on as a full time writer.

And Nellie jumps in with both feet investigating the harsh lives of factory girls. Trouble was the owners of those factories didn’t like their poor and downright dangerous working conditions exposed. They complained to the newspaper, and Nellie ended up being demoted to writing articles on fashion and gardening.

Big surprise. She didn’t like this work. 

So at this point she decides to take matters into her own hands and declares she’s going to write something no one has ever seen before. Now, keep in mind, she’s only 21 at this point, but she’s decided she’s going to be a real journalist, and sets out on the road to be a foreign correspondent reporting from Mexico. 

She gets to know the Mexican people, and ends up writing a fairly well received book about their lives. And she also joins in on a few protests against the Mexican government. This doesn’t go over well, because dictators don’t like protestors. She gets threatened with arrest, she hightails, it and when she gets back to Pittsburgh, she writes some pretty damning reports about the tyrannical Mexican government.

And despite all this, when she returns, the newspaper puts her back on the fashion and gardening articles.

Sheesh, what’s a girl got to do?

Move to New York, that’s what. In 1887, she leaves Pittsburgh, she’s completely broke, and she ends up talking her way into a job with the paper New York World. And it’s here she really gets committed to her work. Literally. 

Because it’s with the aim of revealing the horrible conditions within mental asylums she purposely gets herself committed to the Women’s Lunatic Asylum.

In the asylum, as expected, she discovers the utter brutality, cruelty, neglect, and just nasty living conditions. And she makes it through ten days before the New York World gets her released. She ends up writing not just an article exposing the horrors, but an entire book which stirred up such a sensation it ended up bringing reform to the asylum system.

All of which means, Nellie had just proved for the first time what girls were good for and that women were skilled enough to be true reporters, not just writers of fluff pieces or baby makers.

Now don’t worry, I haven’t gone fully off track because we’re now up to 1888 when Nellie’s reporting career meets up with 80 Days Around the World? 

So, in 1888, Nellie’s looking for an idea and suggests testing out whether Verne’s tale can actually be done. The editor sits on the idea, then in November 1889, he decides, “Yeah, that’s a a great idea.” So, with two days notice, she’s told to get packed and get her butt around the world in 80 days or less.

So, Nellie grabs nothing more than a small satchel, picture something like an old timey doctor’s bag, to hold a few toiletries and her underwear. She brings nothing to wear other than the dress she had on and her coat, and the only other item she brings is a couple hundred dollars that she’s tucked into a punch she wears around her neck. I mean, talk about traveling light!

Meanwhile over at Cosmo, yes, THE Cosmo, they’ve gotten wind of this scheme and send Elizabeth Bisland off on the same day, but in the opposite direction as Nellie (Nellie goes east as Phileas Fogg and Passepartout did in the story). 

And Bisland — and believe me, she’s fooling no one — tells everyone she’s just doing it for a personal adventure, and she’s not in any way competing with Nellie. I picture this statement being delivered with plenty of knowing eye winks. 

Nellie does follow Verne’s route as closely as possible and she even meets June Verne on the way. Although unlike Phileas and Passepartout, she does not rescue an Indian princess…such an underachiever, right? 

Anyway, while Nellie’s away, just like people did with 80 Days Around the World, the New York World organizes a betting scheme. Whoever guesses the exact minute Nellie will arrive will win a free trip to Europe. 

As she’s traveling, people are able to keep up with adventures and progress, because she’s sending cables and telegraphs at each stop to report her progress, as well as longer dispatches that are by sent mail which end up taking weeks to get to the paper. 

And she’s making really good time until she hits bad weather making the crossing to San Francisco. This puts her two days behind and risks Bisland catching up. Well Pulitzer, who I haven’t mentioned yet, but he owns the New York World is not about to risk losing this race, and so he hires a private train to whisk Nelli from the West Coast to New York where she arrives at 3:51 pm on the 25 of January 1890…72 days after taking off. At the time, that was a world record for going around the world.

No word on if anyone won that free trip to Europe, but Bisland wouldn’t arrive back to New York for four more days. 

And this newspaper stunt wasn’t the only time people have taken Verne’s book as some sort of challenge. Plenty of people have done the whirlwind tour and continue to do it today. 

For example, in 1903, James Willis Sayre of Seattle made an around the world trip in only 54 days using nothing but public transportation. In 1928, which would have been Verne’s 100th birthday, a Dutch newspaper sponsored 15-year-old Palle Huld to go around the world by train and ship. He made it in 44 days, but again, did not rescue an Indian princess. Lame. And in 1988, Michael Palin of Monty Python fame, did the an around the world journey for a television program using only ground and sea transport, no airplanes, which I’m sure Greta Thunberg would love. And he made the trip in 79 days and 7 hours, which just strikes me as being a bit theatrical.

Anyway, back to Nellie. She continues to write until, at 31, she marries the 73-year-old Robert Seaman. He owns an ironworks company that makes steel bottles for milk and for boilers and Nellie helps him run the company. But nine years after they marry he dies and Nellie fully takes over operations. 

Nellie after all her investigations into working peoples’ lives, runs the company under the idea that workers should be treated well, including being provided health benefits and safe working conditions. Revolutionary! She also, for what it’s worth, invented a new type of milk can and a stackable type of garbage can.

So, it seems like Nellie is a wonder woman. She can do anything. Well, maybe not. She ends being crap at financial matters and ends up losing the entire company. Oops.

But luckily there’s a war on…and yes, that would be World War I. I am not getting that wrong this time! She ends up reporting on the Eastern Front of Europe and becomes one of the very first journalists, and certainly the first woman, to report from there. When she returned home, Nellie reported on Woman’s suffrage and other social issues. Unfortunately, in 1922, Nellie contracts pneumonia and doesn’t survive, but her story does live on and her work did pave the way for other female journalists.

So that is your two for one episode. Nellie Bly and 80 Days Around the World. If this has you curious about Nellie’s journey, get your hands on a copy of Eighty Days by Matthew Goodman. It’s a great read and really delves into an amazing adventure story, and a pretty incredible lady.

Writing Update – I’ve just finished the second book of my Cassie Black trilogy. Again. I know, I know, I said this was done a few weeks ago, but that draft was mainly filling in some giant plot holes and basically rewriting a huge chunk of the book. This draft was to see how those new additions fit into the scheme of things and of course some of them didn’t, so I had to rearrange a few events, trickle in a few more hints and teasers to set things up for the grand finale, and to hone some of the overall language and settings. But, I think this one is really close to done and I’ve sent it off to my eagle-eyed beta readers to see what they think.

As for the podcast, there’s not much other than if you’re on my newsletter you should have gotten your Book Owl Coloring Pages in the email for Episode 12. And any new sign ups will automatically get those coloring pages, because I’m sure we could all use a way to take our minds off things lately.

Alright everyone, that is it for The Book Owl Podcast! Thanks so much for listening, if you enjoyed this, tell a friend or leave a review, and I will hoot at you next time!

The book owl podcast is a production of daisy dog media, copyright 2020, all rights reserved. The theme music was composed by Kevin Macleod. Audio processing by Auphonic.com

 

Book History, Journalism, podcast

Fake News – The 1835 Version

Hello Book Nerds!

Fake news is nothing new, but it used to be a lot more fun. In this episode of the podcast, we  launch ourselves into some out of this world reporting from 1835 when The New York Sun published six articles that captured the world’s overactive imagination.

It’s a story that combines Edgar Allan Poe, the astronomer John Herschel, tailless beavers, and even Batman, and I know you’re going to love it.

Behind the Scenes

I had never heard of the Great Moon Hoax until about a month ago when I was looking over a book about steampunk culture (for research for a possible future writing project). A little side story in the book told about a hoax article Edgar Allan Poe had written back in the 1840s.

Since I’d recently read something about a bit of journalism flimflam that took place in Oregon in the late 1800s/early 1900s this got me curious about other news hoaxes. And that brought me to find the Great Moon Hoax.

To say I enjoyed this story is a complete understatement. Talk about laughing out loud. After the serious tone of the last episode, it was just what I needed. Of all the episodes so far (and I know there’s only six), this was my absolute favorite to research, write, and record.

I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. Happy listening!!

One more note, subscribers to The Book Owl Podcast Newsletter get a bonus treat with every episode…and this time it’s images from the Great Moon Hoax articles! You don’t want to miss these or any future goodies, so do be sure to sign up today.

Clicking the image will take you to the episode’s web page where you can listen, or you can use the links just under the image to find plenty of other listening options. If you’d like to read along, a rough transcript is a bit lower down.

Listening links…

Links mentioned…

The Transcript

Hey everyone, this is Tammie Painter and you’re listening to the Book Owl Podcast, the podcast where I entertain your inner book nerd with tales of quirky books and literary lore.

It’s episode six and this time we’re stepping away from books and wandering into the wild world of journalism and newspapers. Now, if you’ve dared to look at any social media over the past few years, you’ll have seen a certain person shouting about Fake News. Whether or not you want to believe those tirades, fake news is real. Or at least it was back in August 1835 when the country, and even the world was swept up in some truly out of this world fake news. Hold on to your spaceships because as I promised last time, this is going to be a fun episode.

But first, I just want to say if you’re enjoying this podcast you can show your support by doing nothing other than the shopping you normally do. See, the folks over at Amazon have said to The Book Owl, “If you send customers our way, we’ll give you a tiny commission.” And the Book Owl said, “Hooty-licious!” 

How it works is that for any item you buy on Amazon, I’ll get a tiny percentage to help with the costs of keeping the show running. It’s costs you nothing extra and it’s super simple. All you have to do is, the next time you think you need something from Amazon, rather than going directly to Amazon, go instead to the book owl podcast dot com slash support and head to Amazon using the link on that page and then I get my commission. This only applies to my U.S. listeners, but that page has other super affordable ways to help keep the show running.

Okay, are you ready for some fake news? Then let’s get in the way back machine and head to New York, 1835.

It’s the 25th of August and as people open up their copies of the New York Sun they’re greeted with the first of six articles about a major scientific discovery. It could revolutionize their understanding of the world, it could mean we’re not alone in the universe, or it could just mean people are really, really gullible.

So these articles became known as the Great Moon Hoax and were supposed to have been written by Dr. Andrew Grant to report on a study published in the Edinburgh Journal of Science. Now, scientific journals aren’t anything you would normally pick up to read. Because laypeople couldn’t possibly understand the complexities of scientific jargon, Grant decided to write a series of articles explaining in easy to read language an amazing discovery. 

Grant, who I’ll just tell you now was a complete fabrication, was a colleague of Sir John Herschel and these articles reported on Herschel’s recent work.

Now John Herschel was a real person and he really was an astronomer among many other things. In Grant’s story, Herschel had gone to South Africa in 1834 to set up a huge telescope at a new observatory. The first article was primarily about this telescope and the set up. But the next few articles were all about what Herschel observed using this telescope.

And what did Herschel observe? Wonders upon wonders! I mean the very fact that Herschel didn’t have heart failure from the excitement should have been a clue this was a hoax. I mean the moon was amazing! First there was the landscape. A white pockmarked surface? Hell no! Sure the moon had its craters, but it also featured amethyst crystal outcroppings, flowing rivers, lush tropical vegetation, and beaches. 

What? Tell me more! Sorry, you need to buy the next paper to learn that these landscapes were nothing compared to Herschel’s other findings.

And people did. Basically, the New York Sun was running the click bait scam of the day. The paper’s sales prior to these articles had been slumping, but as people became eager to learn more about this unprecedented discovery, sales dare I say, skyrocketed.

But that’s not to say people didn’t get their money’s worth. Because the next article revealed…are you ready for this…

There was life on the moon. And you’re going to want to really pay attention here because this is good. So we start off a bit tame with some bison, then move up to unicorns (because why not), but there were also two-legged tail-less beavers (I’m not sure how these are beavers at this point, but…), and human like beings with bat wings. Yes, the moon, not Gotham City, was the original home of Batman. 

Unfortunately the moon missed out on a huge franchise opportunity by naming them man bats. Grant reported Herschel had, and I quote, “scientifically denominated them as Vespertillo homo, or man bat and they are doubtless innocent and happy creatures.” 

Okay so as I said, Grant was a pseudonym, and it’s believed that  the actual author of the articles was a man named Richard Adams Locke, who honestly didn’t think people were gullible enough to believe this stuff. But as we know, people believe what they want to believe. And you couldn’t argue with the sales The Sun was seeing. So, Locke wisely kept mum about the hoax.

 The story wasn’t just being picked up in New York. It spread throughout the U.S. And across the pond to Italy, Germany, and the UK. Even a big ol’ smarty pants like Ralph Waldo Emerson was taken in. As were some scientists from Yale who, as scientists are wont to do, were eager to see the source material for Grant’s articles. 

So they traveled to New York to see first hand the study in the Edinburgh Journal of Science. Trouble was, that scientific journal had ceased publication in 1833. But as I said, Locke and the Sun wanted to keep things under wraps to keep sales coming in, so they ended up shuffling these Yale guys from the printing office to another office back to the printing office until the guys couldn’t stay any longer. They returned to Yale none the wiser.

Eventually however, people began to question the articles’ veracity. And this doubt started with the very first article that one where they were talking about Herschel’s telescope set up. This was supposedly a telescope with a diameter of 24 feet and weighed 7 tons, or 6700 kilograms. This massive thing according to the article had been transported from England to South Africa, and this was the early 1800s, they had enough trouble just transporting basic cargo let alone a giant delicate piece of scientific equipment. 

The skeptics finally got their way and a month after the first article came out, The Sun revealed that all the articles were indeed just a bit of satire. In fact, Locke, remember he’s the guy who had written the articles, had a specific target he was poking fun at. 

See, astronomy was capturing people’s imagination…maybe a bit too much. In 1824 a German professor of astronomy…a professor mind you, published a paper with the lengthy title of “Discovery of Many Distinct traces of lunar inhabitants, especially one of their colossal buildings.” In the paper he reports seeing roads and cities on the moon. I think the professor was dipping into the beer stein a few too many times during the day. 

But it was papers like these that had people convinced life really did exist on the moon and this led up to speculations by Reverend Thomas Dick who asserted without any room for doubt that that moon had 4.2 billion inhabitants. Now keep in mind that Earth at that time had only around 1 billion people living on it. Locke couldn’t resist poking fun at such an idea. And poke he did.

So what was the end result of this? Did people cry foul at the Sun, did they demand the paper be shut down, did they cancel their subscriptions? Nope. They had a good laugh at themselves and The Sun’s sales stayed fairly steady.

And the hoax wasn’t just a one and done thing. Over the next few months you could buy yourself Moon Hoax Merchandise including wall paper and snuff boxes. From the time of the big reveal and throughout the rest of 19th century anything deceptive was called Moon Hoax-y. 

But what about Herschel? Was his career ruined by this hoax? Did people claim he was less credible as a scientist? Nope again. In fact, at first he was amused by the articles and kind of enjoyed the silliness of them. But as the years went on he got a little annoyed because people kept asking him about the life he’d discovered on the moon. 

The only person who seems to have been really bothered by the hoax was Edgar Allan Poe. See Locke had been his editor, and a few months prior to the hoax, Poe had written a short story about life on the moon, with some similarities to the Great Moon Hoax articles. A story Locke had edited. The story had been published in another paper but was never popular. I think Poe was mainly upset that Locke’s version of the story got more attention than his own. But a few years later, the Sun published another series of hoax articles written by Poe about a hot air ballon ride over the Atlantic. Unfortunately for Poe, these articles just didn’t grab the world like the Great Moon Hoax.

So that’s it for the moon hoax. All I can say is that the fake news of 1835 was way more entertaining than the supposed fake news of today. 

For those of you who get The Book Owl Podcast newsletter I’m going to include a few wonderful images of those moon inhabitants as part of your bonus goodies. If you aren’t already part of the flock, be sure to sign up at the book owl podcast dot com slash contact. 

If you’d like to keep listening I’ve got a quick personal update as well as a Book Owl update coming up, but if you’re done, I just want to thank you for putting me in your ears. And if you like what you’ve heard, it’d be wonderful if you told just one other person about the show.

Okay, update time.

As the Book Owl Podcast. We’ve made a new nest over on YouTube! That’s right. There’s not really video, it’s just a show graphic, but if you click play you’ll get the full podcast episode right through your computer speakers. If you’re a fan of YouTube, I’ll have the link to the channel in the show notes, or you can just search for the book owl podcast the next time you’re popping into YouTube Land. 

As for my personal update, during the month of June I’m taking a break from my Cassie Black contemporary fantasy trilogy. Starting July , I’ll be editing and rewriting like mad, so I wanted to give my brain some time off from it. In the meantime though I’ve been drafting a stand alone novel that combines fantasy with a tiny bit of sci-fi. I’m more than half way through…which means I’ve climbed the highest hill and now should have smooth sailing from here on out. Or so I hope.

Alright everyone, that is it for The Book Owl, Thanks so much for listening and I will hoot at you next time!

The book owl podcast is a production fo daisy dog media, copyright 2020, all rights reserved. The theme music was composed by Kevin Macleod.

Book History, podcast, Quirky Books

A Girl Named Anne Gets a Diary

Hello Book Nerds,

Seventy-eight years ago, a girl had her 13th birthday. And on that birthday she was given a book. The pages of that book were completely blank until she quickly jotted down a single sentence expressing her hope that the book would be a great support to her. 

Her writing career was cut brutally short two years later.

The girl was Anne Frank. The book in question would become her diary and a record of life trying to be normal under a very abnormal circumstances. And unfortunately, hate and utter cruelty would put an end to that life.

And it’s the story of how her diary turned into a book that would resonate and inspire hope in people across the world that I’m covering in this latest episode of The Book Owl Podcast.

Behind the Scenes

So when I was digging into a podcast topic for The Book Owl Podcast a couple weeks ago, I discovered that Anne Frank had been given her infamous diary on 12 June, which matched up well with my next release date of 11 June.

At the time, I was only thinking of how well Anne’s life in the attic could provide some perspective into everyone whining about Stay Home orders.

At the time, a man named George Floyd was still alive.

At the time, protesters against hatred and racism weren’t raising their voices across the country.

By the time I’d finished recording and editing, well…you know….

I really hadn’t intended the podcast episode to be a reflection on where hatred leads, but it’s hard not to tell the story of a young girl who died for no other reason than hatred and cruelty spurred on by the people in power without thinking about what’s going on today.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy this more somber and timely episode. Clicking the image will take you to the episode’s web page where you can listen, or you can use the links just under the image to find plenty of other listening options.

Be Kind and Be Safe!!

Listening links…

Links mentioned…

Rough Transcript

Hey everyone, this is Tammie Painter and you’re listening to the Book Owl Podcast, the podcast where I entertain your inner book nerd with tales of quirky books and literary lore.

And while I usually try to keep things light and fun on this show, today we’re going to get a little somber with a story of a very special, very inspiring book written by a young girl who had great hopes for her future.

Now, because this is a more serious show, I’m not going to sully it with any sponsorship stuff. But I do want to say thanks to everyone who has been listening to the show! I love delving into these stories about books and libraries and stuff and it’s really humbling that you’re listening to them. 

And I want to give a ginormous amount of thank yous to Helen Crawford who mentioned the show on her blog a couple weeks ago. Helen, well, Helen makes monsters and I’m going to put a link in the show notes because you have to check her creations out. Each one of her hand knit Beasties – of which I have three – is unique, made of high-quality materials, and the amount of work and detail she puts into each one blows my mind. So do check out her site, but be warned…once you invite a Beastie into your life, things will never be the same!

Also I know a few of you over on Twitter have been sharing the podcast with others and that’s really brought a big grin to my face as have the very unexpected comments about my speaking voice. I’m going to be honest I HATE my voice and that really held me back from starting a podcast. So these compliments hav felt really weird and really unexpected and have really given me a huge boost in this endeavor. Anyway, as ever, if you like the show, I’d love it if you told just one other person about it. 

Alright enough babbling. It’s time to put a somber expression on The Book Owl’s beak. 

So, I’m releasing this episode on 11 June, but it’s actually in honor of a certain book that was given on 12 June 1942 to a girl on her 13th birthday. The pages of that book were completely blank until she quickly jotted down a single sentence expressing her hope that the book would be a great support to her. 

Her writing career was cut brutally short two years later, but her words of hope still touch readers today.

The girl was Anne Frank. The book in question would become her diary and a record of life trying to be normal under a very abnormal circumstances. And unfortunately, hate and utter cruelty would put an end to that life.

So Anne Frank was Jewish and she was born in 1929 in Frankfurt, Germany. This is right around the period when Germany was reeling from their defeat in World War I, their economy had tanked, and the Nazi’s were rising to power under the leadership of a rabble rousing, racist rogue named Adolf Hitler. So, basically Anne was born in both a really bad time and a really bad place to be Jewish. 

Because they didn’t like the vibe in Germany and because the German economy was doing so poorly, Anne’s parents, Otto and Edith, decide to move to Amsterdam. Good plan, Amsterdam’s a great city. Unfortunately, Hitler’s army shows up there in 1940 and starts throwing its weight around, including severe restrictions on Jews.

Then in early 1942, Anne’s older sister Margot gets a letter telling her she’s been recruited for work at a special camp. Yeah, just like a phishing spam email today, Otto and Edith weren’t buying this ruse. Trouble is they can’t leave the Netherlands due to those restrictions I just mentioned. 

So, Otto, again seeing what’s about to happen, begins remodeling the attic of his business on Prinsengracht. And one June day his daughter Anne picks out a journal which she is given as her birthday gift. About a month later, Otto’s family – which were himself, Edith, Margot, and Anne – and four other people enter the small attic that would be their their home for the next two years.

And during this time, Anne Frank writes in her journal. And boy does she write. She ends up filling most of the diary, then continues on filling up notebooks given to her by Margot.

At first Anne writes her diary to a range of imaginary friends, but by September she starts writing to one person who she names Kitty. Well, apparently Kitty was the cat’s meow because it’s not long after that Anne is writing solely to Kitty and dreaming of hanging out with her in Switzerland, which was neutral at the time, where they would go skating, star in a film, and probably giggle a lot over boys. 

So anyone who has been a teenage girl knows you have thoughts and feelings that you just HAVE to get out or you’ll burst. And of course you can’t tell anyone those feelings. I mean THEY wouldn’t understand, so you commit them to paper. Anne was no different and this seems to be the primary reason she started her diary. 

But we don’t really remember Anne as being full of teenage angst. We mainly remember her account of her daily life in the attic. So, what inspired this secondary work? Well, On 28 March 1944, keep in mind this is nearly two years since they entered the attic, the Dutch minister asked his people to keep a record of what was happening to them so they would be able to document what had happened during the German occupation. Anne got word of this request and set to work poring over her journals and rewriting portions of it into a new text that would be called The Secret Annex. 

During this rewrite she did plenty of self-editing and since she was the ripe old age of fifteen, gave a critical eye to that 13 year old Anne had written. She worked in missed details and left out a few details that had made it into her diary such as her crush on Peter and some very teenage comments about her mom such as, ‘my mother is in most things an example to me, but then an example of precisely how I shouldn’t do things.’ Ooh, snap.

I’m not sure exactly when Anne completed her rewrite, but in August 1944, Anne, her family, the four others in the attic, and the people who helped them were arrested during a Nazi raid of the premises.

Anne and 100s of others were crammed into train cars for the three-day journey to Auschwitz. And I know it doesn’t get all that hot in the Netherlands, but this was August and that’s a lot of bodies crammed together. It was likely incredibly hot and miserable as well as terrifying because by this point they knew exactly what happened to Jews who entered Auschwitz. 

Of the 100s of people on that train, 350 were immediately sent to the gas chamber. 

Anne and her family were strong and healthy enough not put be to death, and were instead selected for labor. Her dad went to the mens’ camp, she and her mom and sister went to the women’s camp. Sadly, even mom and daughters wouldn’t be allowed to stay together. Edith was kept at Auschwitz while Margot and Anne were sent off to Bergen Belsen in October 1944. Edith would die at Auschwitz only weeks before the camp was liberated.

At Bergen-Belsen, the cold, wet, cramped conditions of winter, and the severe lack of food left the girls susceptible to disease. The both died of typhus in February 1945. 

Of the eight people in the attic, Otto would be the only one to survive. When the camp was liberated, he weighed only 52 kilo, 114 pounds, and could barely walk.

But wait, remember those helpers who wee also arrested at the same time as the Franks? Well, they eventually were freed and two of them, Miep Gies and Bep Voskuil found Anne’s diaries. Miep held onto them hoping that one day she would be able to give them back to Anne. Instead, she gave them to Otto.

As you can imagine, Otto was torn. He wanted to read Anne’s words to bring his daughter back to life in some way, but it was also painfully hard for him to read those words. It took a while, but he did eventually read the diaries and couldn’t believe how strong her writing was. He’s quoted as saying

 ‘The Anne that appeared before me was very different from the daughter I had lost. I had had no idea of the depth of her thoughts and feelings.’

Like any proud papa, Otto showed his daughter’s work to a few family members who ended up showing a few friends who then encouraged Otto to compile them into a formal book and publish them because these were important words that needed to be read by others.

In 1947, The Secret Annex was published. Anne would have been eighteen. Upon its publication Otto said, ‘How proud Anne would have been if she had lived to see this.” Because Apparently in March 1944, she had written “Imagine how interesting it would be if I published a novel about the Secret Annex.”

Imagine.  Because of hatred, Anne’s life ends painfully early, but because of a few brave people she was able to live long enough to tell an amazing story that would impact thousands upon thousands of lives for years to come. 

And so while this episode is about Anne Frank and her diary, I also think it’s important to remember the people who helped her and her family. I mean these people stuck their necks out to help knowing full well that they risked being arrested and sent to the concentration camps for doing so. 

So while Anne Frank’s name is famous, it’s important to remember those who did their best to keep her and her family alive. They include…

Mies Gies  Her husband Jan Gies  Victor Kugler

Johannes Kleiman  Johan Voskuijl   And his mom Bep Voskuijl

Yeah, I don’t know where to go from here. Stop hating, stop giving voice to people who spread hate and incite violence, and do your best to be tolerant and compassionate. 

As Anne said…

“What is done cannot be undone, but one can prevent it happening again.”

Thanks for so much for listening and I promise more fun and giggles with the next episode. Since this is a longer episode than normal I’ll skip the personal update. However, I do want to say that I’d love to hear from you. If you have a favorite book or book-related topic you’d love me to explore, don’t be shy about suggesting it for a future show. The best way to get in touch is at thebookowlpodcast.com/contact.

And as ever, If you like what you’ve heard, please do subscribe to the show, and if you want to get more out of every episode, be sure to join the flock by signing up for the book owl podcast newsletter. All the links you need are in the show notes. The book owl podcast is a production fo daisy dog media, copyright 2020, all rights reserved. The theme music was composed by Kevin Macleod.