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Don’t Miss the National Book Festival 2020

Hello Book Lovers!!

Just a quick note this week to make sure you don’t miss out on the Library of Congress’s FREE event this weekend…

The National Book Festival of 2020

(finally, something good about this year)

All you have to do is visit the link above, then enter your name and email and you’re registered to virtually attend a gobsmacking amount of lectures about historic books, about book preservation, about books books books.

There’s also discussions on other aspects of the LOC, plus loads of live author chats including John Grisham, Kwame Mbalia, Thomas Frank, Sarah Scoles, and oodles more!

The festival starts Friday (25 September) and runs through Sunday the 27th. Once you sign up, you’re free to pick and choose as many or as few programs that interest you.

Have a great book-filled weekend!!!

And if you missed out on Agatha Christie hanging ten last week, be sure to give Episode 12 a listen.

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If you’re looking for something unforgettable to read this weekend, try this…..

Authors, podcast

Happy (Belated) Birthday to Agatha Christie

Hello Book Nerds!

Agatha Christie: Mistress of Mystery, Duchess of Death, Queen of….Surfing? That’s right. Discover the events that turned Christie not only into one of the world’s most popular mystery writers, but also one who knew how to hang ten on the waves of Hawaii.

Behind the Scenes

Soon after I started the podcast, I looked over a calendar full of author birthdays and I just knew I had to do an episode for Agatha Christie. She’s not my favorite author, but I do know if I need to grab something for a quick and fun escape, her books will never fail.

New Mailing Surprise!

Just one more quick thing before I unleash you on the podcast…I’ve added a little gift if you sign up for The Book Owl Podcast Newsletter. So, if you want to get more out of each episode AND get your hands on your very own Book Owl Coloring Pages, be sure to sign up today.

Okay, enjoy the episode!!!

As usual, clicking the image below will take you to the episode’s web page where you can listen right in your browser, or you can use the links just under the image to find plenty of other listening options. And remember, all these listening options are completely free!!

 

Listening links…

Links mentioned in this episode…

The (Rough) Transcript

Hey everyone, this is Tammie Painter and you’re listening to the Book Owl Podcast, the podcast where I entertain your inner book nerd with tales of quirky books and literary lore.

So this episode is set to come out on the 17th of September, which oddly enough is National Cheeseburger Day. And that has nothing to do with books, so let’s go back a couple days to the 15th of September, which does have to do with books because it was the 130th birthday of Agatha Christie.

Even if you don’t read mysteries, you’ve probably heard of Agatha Christie. She wrote 66 full length detective novels, plus enough short stories to fill 14 collections. She’s known as the Duchess of Death, the Mistress of Mystery, and the Queen of Crime, but as you’ll soon find out, she maybe should have been given the title Queen of Hanging Ten.

But before we start, I’m just going to put in a quick request for you to either leave a review for the Book Owl Podcast on whatever app you’re listening in right now, or to head to Podchaser and leave a review, or to just share the show with a fellow book nerd. Any little bit can really make a difference. After all, if The Book Owl doesn’t get enough attention she starts plucking out her feathers. And no one wants a bald Book Owl, do they?

Also, as I’m recording this we’ve got wildfires raging not far from my home and the air is super smoky. So smoky the air quality has been listed as off the charts hazardous, so if my voice sounds a bit dry or cracky, that’s why.

Alright, onto Agatha. She was born to a fairly wealthy family in the English countryside in 1890. And while it sounds like she had a mostly happy childhood, ti was also a strange one. Her mom didn’t think Agatha should be allowed to read until she was at least eight years old. Agatha also two siblings who were about a decade older than her, but they’d been sent off to boarding school. And with her siblings away, plus being so much older than her, she was left home alone with only her parents and pets for company.

Like any lonely kid, Agatha spent the time making up imaginary friends and the precocious little Aggie thwarted her mom and taught herself to read by the time she was five. When Agatha was 11 her dad died after a bunch of financial setbacks basically did his health in. Agatha’s mom took the death hard and really clung to her youngest daughter and the two formed a really strong bond that would come to throw Agatha for a loop later in her life.

When she’s 12, Agatha finally gets to go to school. But after the freedom of her homeschooling, she finds the classroom structure too rigid and doesn’t do well. During this time she’s been making a few friends and they’ve been creating and performing little plays, so it’s thought maybe Agatha would do well in the theater. So despite the growing money worries, she’s sent to Paris at age 15 to train in voice work and piano. Well, turns out, no surprise since she’s grown up mostly alone, Agatha does not do well performing in front of people she doesn’t know and it’s not long before she abandons a career in the theater and heads back to England.

So Agatha is 18 when she writes her first short story. And it really sounds like an odd story full of the spiritualism which was popular at the time and dream sequences and explorations of madness. She also writes several other stories and sends them off for publication. They were all rejected. Don’t worry, Aggie, we’ve all been there.

During this time Agatha’s mom doesn’t have the strongest constitution and it’s advised she spend a winter in a dry climate. She and Agatha head off to Egypt, and its this trip that inspires her first novel which she titles Snow Upon the Desert. 

Yeah, like the short stories, the novel one was also rejected. She tried and tried, and even enlisted a family friend who was also a writer and who introduced her to his agent…who also rejected the novel. But he saw some potential and advised Agatha to write another book and see how it went.

Okay, meanwhile, Agatha is starting to break out of her shell a bit. She’s going to parties, she’s going dancing, she’s roller skating, and she’s meeting boys…many of whom propose marriage. But it’s Archibald Christie, who she meets at a dance near her home in 1912, who sweeps her off her feet. They’re engaged within three months but neither has the money to marry and set up a household so the engagement just kind of fixes for a while.

Then World War I breaks out. Archie’s an aviator with the Royal Flying Corps and he gets called up in August 1914. On his leave in December, the two decide there’s no time like the present and get married. And Agatha really doesn’t see much of her husband for the duration of the war. She instead spends her time volunteering at the Red Cross. It’s also during this period that  we start building on what will truly being influencing Agatha’s future writing. Because while at the Red Cross Agatha earns a qualification as an apothecary’s assistant and begins working in the dispensary…and learning about poisons.

It was during this time while Archie was away, that Agatha wrote her first novel featuring Hercule Poirot. And the persnickety little Belgian was inspired both by the Belgian refugees near where she was living, but also by the Belgians she treated at the Red Cross. And I kind fo wonder what those Belgians thought of the character if they ended up reading the book.

So it’s been quite a few years since Agatha had written anything. What stirred up the writing bug again? Part of it had to do with her love of detective stories by Wilkie Collins and Arthur Conan Doyle, but it mainly had to do with her sister betting her that she couldn’t write a convincing detective story.

Agatha won the bet. The Mysterious Affair at Styles not only got published, but was even lauded by the Pharmaceutical Journal for her accuracy with the poisons used in the book. And her pharmacy training really does pay off because over half of Agatha’s novels use poison as the murder weapon.

So Archie returns in 1918 and married life finally begins. They have their only child, Rosalind, in 1919, and Archie’s working in a low-paying financial job, while Agatha is writing. She published her first Tommy & Tuppence novel, then followed that up with another Hercule Poirot book. All within a couple years. The woman was on a roll!

Which meant it was time for her to go on tour. It wasn’t really a book tour, but more of a Look How Amazing The British Are Tour around the world. This was in 1922 and included stops all across the globe, including South Africa where she tried her hand at surfing. By the time she got to Hawaii, Agatha was able to pop up on hear board and, this really is the fun fact of the episode, she became the first British woman to do stand-up surfing. Go Aggie!

But all doesn’t stay so stellar for Agatha. In 1926, she gets two serious setbacks. First her mom dies, and this sends Agatha into a deep depression. Then she learns Archie has fallen in love with another woman. She files for divorce and one night she and Archie get in a big fight. Agatha takes off and just disappears. The next day her car is found near a quarry with her license and her clothes inside, but no Agatha.

By now Agatha Christie is a very big deal, the disappearance makes front page news on the New York Times, and something like 1000 police, 15000 volunteers, and even airplanes sent out to search for her. Even Arthur Conan Doyle got in on the act and took one of her gloves to a psychic to try to get some answers.

Well, ten days later a spa hotel employee recognizes Agatha who’s been staying there the whole time. She’s checked in under the name Teressa Neele. And Neele happened to be the last name of her husband’s mistress. Once discovered, she left and went to hide out at her sister’s and refused to talk about the situation to anyone, so no one to this day really knows why she did this.

People were fuming. They saw Agatha’s meltdown as a publicity stunt or as a way to frame her husband for murder. Agatha even tried to claim she had amnesia, but I think the use of the mistress’s name doesn’t really fit with that excuse. 

Well, finally almost 2 years later, the divorce goes through. Archie did not waste any time and married Ms. Neele a week later.

Understandably, Agatha gets frustrated with her life in the UK, so she takes the Orient Express to the Middle East. And what a fortuitous trip. She not only gets the inspiration for a certain book, but she also meets a couple of archaeologists who invite her to come back and dig with them. I guess that happened back then. So she goes back in 1930 and its on this return trip she meets Max Mallowan…an archaeologist 13 years younger than her. 

This was exactly what Agatha needed. She went with Max on digs and they traveled a lot, and this inspired more novels, many of which were set in the Middle East where Max was working. 

So just to wrap up Agatha’s story, during World War II she went to work in the pharmacy at University College London and it was here that one of the pharmacists suggested using thallium as a poison. In a book, not in real life…I hope. Anyway, this idea became a book called The Pale Horse and as a little twist, in 1977, a doctor who had read the book helped solve a murder by because he recognized the symptoms of thallium poisoning from the story.

Agatha died in 1976 of natural causes. In 1977, Hercule Poirot was the first fictional character to have his obituary in the paper…the New York Times.

Phew, that was a quite an episode. Of course there’s more to Agatha’s life and if you want to get a more in depth look into Agatha Christie’s world and her works, you can go to Agatha Christie dot com where you will find all kinds of goodies.

Okay, that’s it for Agatha.. Time for some writing news…

My historical fantasy novel Domna has been relaunched with a new cover. Of course this update doesn’t work very well for an audio bit of news, but the new cover is really eye-catching. Of course, I’ve got the link in the show notes if you’d like to take a look, and to celebrate the new look, I’ve got a 50% off sale going on the Complete Series – that’s all 6 books, plus some exclusive bonus stuff –  through the rest of the month…and that month is September 2020, in case anyone’s listening to this in the future.

As for podcast news, I don’t really have any other than I’ve got a couple of great episodes planned for October, so fun times ahead!

Alright everyone, that is it for The Book Owl Podcast! Thanks so much for listening, if you enjoyed this, tell a friend or leave a review, and I will hoot at you next time!

The book owl podcast is a production fo daisy dog media, copyright 2020, all rights reserved. The theme music was composed by Kevin Macleod. Audio processing by Auphonic.com

 

Episodes

12. Hanging Ten with Agatha Christie

OOPS!!! (Update) – Just in case anyone thinks I’m a complete idiot….I misspoke and said World War II broke out in 1914, instead of saying World War I. (Insert self-deprecating eye roll.)

Like what you hear?

 

The Book Owl Podcast is a production of Daisy Dog Media, Copyright 2020, All rights reserved.

Theme Music “Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License

Audio processing by Auphonic.com

Literacy

Happy World Literacy Day

Hello Book Nerds!

I know it’s not the Book Owl’s usual posting day, but I just wanted to share the excitement of World Literacy Day with you!

So what’s the day all about? Well, the fine folks over at Wikipedia have this to say…

“8 September was declared international literacy day by UNESCO on 26 October 1966 at 14th session of UNESCO’s General conference. It was celebrated for the first time in 1967. Its aim is to highlight the importance of literacy to individuals, communities and societies.”

And since I (aka “The Book Owl”) love being able to read and think reading is one of the best pastimes EVER, I wanted to celebrate by sharing a couple podcast episodes in which I cover a little bit of literacy, the importance of being a reader, and the strange historical course of inventions that help keep people reading to this very day.

The first is Episode 3 in which the Book Owl delves into that age-old question, the quandary that has stumped philosophers and scientists for centuries, the issue I’m sure has been keeping you up at night….

Do dogs know how to read?

Spoiler alert…no, they don’t, but they can listen which is why our canine buddies are regularly invited into libraries to help build better readers. How does this work? Who came up with the idea? How can you get involved? Find out in Episode 3: Is That A Dog in the Library?!!

Note: I was still getting the hang of things with Episode 3, so the sound quality isn’t the best, but it’s still worth a listen.

Then we have Episode 8: The Story of Seeing Clearly in which I take a peek at the amazing combination of historical events that turned eyeglasses from a luxury item used only by the wealthy to a household commodity (and requisite accessory for many readers…including myself).

From imprisoned Venetians to curing syphilis, the history of eyeglasses is more intriguing than it might seem at first glance (sorry, I couldn’t resist).

Those show links will take you to the episode’s listening page where you’ll also find links to the show’s transcript, in case you know, you wanted to actually read on World Literacy Day!

Enjoy!!!!

Episodes, Museums

11. Chester Beatty’s Marvelous Manuscripts

A rich guy goes around buying up a bunch of stuff. That’s not exactly news, is it? Well, when the guy is Chester Beatty and his shopping expeditions ended up creating and preserving the most extensive collection of ancient papyrus, Middle Eastern illuminated manuscripts, and many other book-related treasure, it draws attention.

In this episode of the Book Owl Podcast we explore how Chester got bit by the collecting bug, how he earned his wealth, and how he thumbed his nose at the British Museum and moved his goodies to Dublin, Ireland.

 

Links mentioned in this episode…

Like what you hear?

The Full Transcript (or Roughly So…)

Hey everyone, this is Tammie Painter and you’re listening to the Book Owl Podcast, the podcast where I entertain your inner book nerd with tales of quirky books and literary lore.

Okay, so we got a little silly in the last episode, but it’s time to get back to, you know, serious business with the story behind a book-filled wonderland that Lonely Planet has called one of the best museums in Europe, and was honored with the Museum of the Year Award in 2002. And after having visited this place myself a ew years ago, I have to agree…although, a bit later I’ll explain what NOT to do when you go there.

But before we start exploring, I just want to say how much I loved all your comments from Episode 9 when we went rolling along with the Bookmobile. And this episode really did kick up some happy memories for you guys. Both Teresa and LaVelle recalled how excited they’d were to see the Bookmobile coming to their neighborhoods. And Jonny of the Jaunts & Haunts blog shared his memories of the Bookmobile, but as we chatted back and forth he also stirred up my own memories when he mentioned the little Scholastic book catalogs you’d get in class. I could spend hours with those things! Also, Tierney of Tierney Creates said our mutual love of the Bookmobile makes us fellow book geeks…an honor I will gladly accept.

Anyway, thanks so much for your comments, and keep them coming. I’ll throw the links in the show notes, but you can comment any time on the Book Owl Podcast blog, on Instagram, by email, or by responding to the newsletter that goes out with every episode and that you should really subscribe to.

Okay, let’s go check out this museum everyone’s raving about. The museum in question is the Chester Beatty and it’s located in the fine city of Dublin, Ireland. 

I’ll get into what you’ll actually see there a later in the episode, but basically this museum houses 25,000 highly artistic manuscripts, rare books, and the world’s most extensive collection of texts on papyrus. Don’t worry, not all 25,000 objects are on display, but what is on display will knock your book nerdy socks off.

Now, as I said, this place is called the Chester Beatty and everything on display is something he collected during his lifetime. But who the hell is Chester Beatty? As I said, I’ve been to the museum, and I still had no idea who he was, so researching this episode was a wonderful bit of discovery.

So Chester was born in 1875, and he was not born into wealth by any means. I mean this guy built himself up from a fairly modest background. In 1898, he graduated from the Columbia School of Mines, which does not like a terribly interesting course of study, but anyway he knew about mines and he needed to put that knowledge to use, so he headed west to Colorado…where like any college grad, he got a grunt job. And in the mining world, that meant digging and clearing rubble from tunnels.

But Chester was no slouch and within only five years he was part of the management team of the Guggenheim Exploration Company, which kind of makes it sound like he should have been going to Antarctic or something, but no, sorry still just Colorado. In this position he not only earned his normal wage, but he also got sort of a profit-sharing deal. So, by the time he was 32, our Chester was a millionaire.

So, I won’t overwhelm you with all the details of his career, but by 1908, he’s left the Guggenheim operation, he’s returned home to New York, and he’s set himself up with his own very profitable consulting business for mining engineers. What could be better? He’s doing great, right? Well, Chester’s life takes a sad turn when his wife of 12 years dies of typhoid.

It’s really too much for Chester. He can’t bear to be in the house they shared any longer, so not long after her death, he packs up the kids and moves to a house he’s bought in London’s Kensington Gardens…swanky! About a year after moving to London, Chester remarries and it really is a great match because they both turn out to be avid collectors.

See, even as a kid Chester loved to collect and he’d go to auctions and bid on rock and ore samples from mining expeditions to add to his collection. While he was in Colorado, he also started collecting stamps, Chinese snuff boxes, Japanese figurines, and most importantly for this episode, ancient documents on papyrus and Islamic manuscripts. And while his career in mining did require some travel, it was really some health troubles that helped him satisfy his pack rat nature.

Chester had some trouble with his lungs and a dry climate helped with that, so he would winter in places like Egypt, but he was also vastly rich, so on his way home, he’d pop over to Japan and Southeast Asia, you know, as you do.

Anyway, back to the thread of the story. As I said, Chester was already raking it in, but when he moved to London he joined a mining compact. During the 1920s the members of this compact took a risk on some mines in Zambia and the Congo. Well, the risk paid off and they discovered copper. The already rich Chester was now super duper rich…and using that money to travel more and add to his manuscript collection.

By now Chester is fully infected with the collecting bug, and by the 1930s he had a strong reputation as a reputable collector. He only bought the finest pieces of work. To help him out, he had agents and advisors who made sure what he was buying was authentic and from trusted sources. This network of agents and his own searches gathered illuminated copies of the Quran; manuscripts from the Mughals, the Turks, and the Persians; as well as ancient works written in Armenian, Greek, Burmese, and more.

And Chester wasn’t just snatching these things up like some crazed Scrooge McDuck swimming in his room full of gold coins. Okay, that was a bad analogy because you can’t really swim in manuscripts, but you get the idea. He wasn’t just buying these texts to say, “Haha, look what I’ve got.” He actually consulted with people on how best to preserve them and in 1934, he converted a portion of his Kensington House into a library and gallery for people to look at these amazing works which were probably from cultures that most people at the time thought backwards or uncivilized.

Oh, and I mentioned his wife was a collector too. Her passion was for antique furniture and paintings, and she actually preserved several pieces of original furnishings that once belonged to Marie Antoinette.

But back to Chester. He’s rich. He’s got lots of stuff. He’s got a stellar reputation as a collector. And he wanted to share his findings. So starting in the 1920s he worked with and shared his finds with the British Museum. And all along he’d been planning on leaving his collection, which was pretty substantial and worth a ton by this point, to the British Museum when he died.

Then, kind of a double whammy of things got on the wrong side of Chester. First up, as with most rich people, he didn’t like taxes. In the 1940s, Britain changed their tax structure in a way that Chester didn’t really like. But the thing that really pushed Chester too far was the hiring of a new director at the British Museum. This guy didn’t not agree with Chester’s involvement…involvement in his own collection, mind you. The new director questioned the quality of Chester’s collection, he insisted he would have the final say in everything, and he insisted the collection only be shown in the British Museum. 

Well, Chester didn’t like this one bit. Go figure. So, in 1950, he took his collection and his vast amounts of wealth, and moved to Dublin…partially because Ireland had a much more favorable tax structure and partially because his son was already living in Kildare County.

Unlike the British Museum, the Irish weren’t about to look a gift horse in the mouth. Chester put his collection on display in a purpose built library/museum in a suburb of Dublin and opened it to share with the public in 1953. But that wasn’t the end of it. Chester also bequeathed his entire collection to the people of Ireland. Not too shabby a gift. And a big FU to the British Museum.

The Irish, possibly learning from the British Museum’s mistake, showed their appreciation. Chester not only was the first person to be made an honorary citizen of Ireland (this was in 1954), but when he died in 1968, he was the first private citizen to be honored with a state funeral. 

So in 2000, the original library was closed down and the collection moved into its own gallery in Dublin Castle. And I have to say, if you’re ever allowed to travel again and you’re in Dublin, get yourself to this exhibit. First up, it’s free which means you’ll have money for a pint of Guiness. Second, it’s incredible.

It’s been described as one of the best collections of Western, Islamic, and Southeast Asian artifacts. And while there are a lot of religious texts on display, the religion is not what’s emphasized, it’s the art and the calligraphy and the beauty of the texts themselves. 

There’s two main exhibits, Arts of the Book and Sacred Traditions, and you might also catch a rotating exhibit, but what you’ll see includes Greek papyrus from the third century, Japanese scrolls that seem to go on forever, Biblical texts in various languages, illustrated texts from the Middle East and Moghul India on religion, medicine, and astronomy, A full collection of Ancient Egyptian Love Songs, and yes, Chester’s snuff boxes from his Colorado collecting days.

Now, here’s where we get to the warning, one thing you must not do if you ever do get a chance to go: Don’t make my mistake and forget your glasses. I could see well enough to enjoy the art of the illustrations, but I could not read a damn thing on any of the display information thingies. 

Anyway, like I said, it’s free and you shouldn’t miss it, but since most of us can’t get to Dublin right now, you can satisfy your curiosity by taking a virtual tour of the collection on the museum’s website, which is really a stellar site and you can read it in Gaelic if you’re so inclined. And I recommend cracking open a Guiness as you spend some time on the virtual tour, you know, just to add to the experience.

Alright, that’s all I’ve got for Chester and his fabulous collection. I’ll have the links in the show notes for everything so you can check out the museum and take that virtual tour, but right now, it’s time for quick update.

And I will make this quick because we’ve already gone on a fair bit of time. The big news is I have mostly finished Book Two of my Cassie Black trilogy. Hoorah! I was really scared heading into this draft because there was a lot of missing stuff that needed filled in, but I squeezed my brain hard enough and the words eventually popped out. In other news, I’ve been having a big think and taking in some good advice and I’m rethinking my entire approach to writing, including scaling back on some things, pushing harder on others, and honestly, I’m feeling really excited about putting it all into place, even if it is going to take a bit of a mindset shift.

Anyway, if you want more of my writing news, I’ve got a link in the show notes for that newsletter.

Alright everyone, that is it for The Book Owl Podcast! Thanks so much for listening, if you enjoyed this, tell a friend or leave a review, and I will hoot at you next time!

The Book Owl Podcast is a production of Daisy Dog Media, Copyright 2020, All rights reserved.

Theme Music “Monkeys Spinning Monkeys” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License

Audio processing by Auphonic.com